The Next England Squad

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Fey

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Fey on Sat Jun 21, 2014 1:47 pm

Allezdian wrote:
As the disappointment of England’s strangely enervating, strangely frantic exit from Brazil 2014 starts to fade into resignation, there will no doubt be an urge to clutch at any lingering positives. And England do at least have one thing to cling to after Friday’s clinching Group D victory for Costa Rica in Recife. The prospect of another catastrophic defeat in Belo Horizonte to match the fabled 1-0 humbling by USA in 1950 has at least been successfully avoided. Too late, old son. We’re way ahead of you this time around.
Instead, it is the defeats in Manaus and São Paulo that will remain the dominant images of England’s tournament. And as is the way of these things, no sooner had Luis Suárez’s knife-between-the-ribs second goal zipped past Joe Hart in the Arena Corinthians than the hunt was on for an instant repository of blame, a conveniently placed chief England miscreant after a pair of narrow, tightly fought defeats to fine and deserving opponents.
At which point: enter, shuffling on and then shuffling off, Steven Gerrard. So fierce is the tide of ambient opinion on these things that Gerrard had already been fixed in the sniper’s sights by the final whistle on Thursday night. And it is true: Gerrard had a horrible match in São Paulo, a match so poor that the Spanish newspaper AS simply refused to give him a mark out of 10 at the end of it. He was bypassed with chastening ease by Edinson Cavani in the buildup to Uruguay’s opener. He flicked on a long punt for Suárez’s second. And, as he had in Manaus, he looked always stretched, always engaged in some scrabbling, lunging attempt to patch the holes in England’s defensive roof.
And yet with England’s active interest in this World Cup now extinguished it is time to change tack a little here, to lift the burden of shared exasperation from those shoulders. It is no secret, and also no bad thing, that Liverpool’s captain will retire from international football at the end of this tournament. It is even possible Gerrard may have started his last match for the national team, with plenty of unused options in that 23-man squad for the bloodless final group match against Costa Rica.
With this in mind it seems depressingly punitive that there are those who will now seek to characterise Gerrard’s season, perhaps even his late playing career, as a tale of two slips: the man who lost his footing against Chelsea; the man who lost his man against Uruguay. Sport has always loved this kind of hammy narrative but it is a temptation that should be resisted here. Gerrard deserves better than this at the end of a venerable England career that, true to his own adrenal style in his prime – a player of good bits, bad bits and brilliant bits – is perhaps best defined by its own best bits.
Gerrard, lest we forget, was once a droolingly coveted youngster, more exciting than any of the current Barkley-Sterling-Wilshere brigade, a player who announced himself with a gorgeously precocious competitive England debut at Euro 2000 marked by that nutmeg of Dietmar Hamann in Charleroi, and seemed briefly and misleadingly to represent English football’s triumph of youthful riches compared with poor old backward-facing Germany. Aged 19 he looked like a player who could do anything, on any pitch, for any team, and whose talent, with some nurture, some reining in, had no obvious upper limits.
In the event Gerrard’s best single moment with England came just eight caps later against the same opponents, with his brilliantly influential role in central midfield in the 5-1 defeat of Germany in Munich. There were other highs: a guiding hand in the most impressive England team of his era at Euro 2004; important goals at the last two World Cups; four controlled performances at Euro 2012 when he made Uefa’s team of the tournament.
And yet it seems fair to say we never did get to see the best of Gerrard with England. The sustained, galvanising run of performances his youthful talents promised never quite materialised. In his late career he never looked like dictating a match in the manner of his contemporary Andrea Pirlo who just seems to be playing at a different pace, with more space around him, a full set of rear-view mirrors, a sense always of where the pieces are moving.
In many ways Gerrard has been unlucky in that his real pomp came before FA scientists made the dramatic discovery, buried deep in their laboratory, that it isn’t actually compulsory for England to play 4-4-2 in every match. Just as a Liverpool-style three-man midfield would have helped him in Brazil, it seems obvious now the spell is broken – oh Sven, and your rigid lines – that the most liberating position for the younger, more explosive Gerrard would have been as an inside forward in a 4-2-3-1, probably to the right given his contribution from that side in Rafa Benítez’s Liverpool teams. Of all the roles he has played for England in between Charleroi and São Paulo – defensive midfield, right midfield, attacking midfield, left midfield, right-back, No10 – it is the last of these that came closest to this role, albeit in unconvincing fashion (for one reason: he’s not a No10).
More recently defensive midfield was always a compromise, a last wringing-out of what remains. And with this in mind, Gerrard has been a little harshly picked out in Brazil. Let’s face it, he is playing for England now only because no one better has come along. With Michael Carrick coming off a poor season and never really settled as an England player for whatever reason, there is a talent vacuum below that older generation, no sign of any thrusting young players in the central positions.
Jack Wilshere, if he can improve his mobility and stay fit, is a man to build a midfield around. This might have been Jack Rodwell’s World Cup in a parallel world where his development (and fitness) kept pace with his salary. James Milner was excellent for Aston Villa in central midfield and could yet be an option for England.
Beyond that, what are we left with? Tom Cleverley looks like the right kind of idea, a kind of own-brand Xavi, but without the required quality. After which it’s Gareth Barry, Tom Huddlestone, Scott Parker, Mark Noble, Lee Cattermole: a miscellany of the tried and the unlikely to be tried.
And so Gerrard has not been quietly relocated to the fringes in the natural way. And he has looked genuinely tired for three months now. Why wouldn’t he too? To criticise his lack of vim in these circumstances is a bit like forcing a single athlete to run every leg of the 4x400m relay and then jeering from the sidelines when he starts slipping down the field in the final bend, arms pumping, eyes boggled with pain. The cavalry never came for Gerrard. And so has lingered on, a little raggedly, to the final cut.
At the end of which Gerrard deserves better than to be hoisted as an emblem of English ineptitude, the skipper who let it slip and all the rest of it. If anything has been exposed at Brazil 2014 it is more the simple lack of alternatives, of budding midfield talent in the system, and beyond that the lack of a game-plan to shield that ageing shield, England’s own game, grizzled but departing midfield factotum.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/jun/20/steven-gerrard-england-scapegoat-uruguay-world-cup

Excellent piece in the Allezdian about Gerrard!

Brian 2468

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Brian 2468 on Sat Jun 21, 2014 1:54 pm

The undeniable single biggest factor that contributes to all the disappointing performances over the years is FEAR. From the day a ball is kicked right up through the ranks players are unknowingly brought up to fail. Every other reason we can muster up comes after this preconditioned illness.

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Murray

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Murray on Sat Jun 21, 2014 1:56 pm

Woy has had an incredibly easy ride from the media. Normally an England manager who presided over a group stage exit would be hung, drawn and quartered.

Brian 2468

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Brian 2468 on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:05 pm

Good. Time for all of us to learn something.
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Pierre Littbarski

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Pierre Littbarski on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:10 pm

Murray wrote:Woy has had an incredibly easy ride from the media. Normally an England manager who presided over a group stage exit would be hung, drawn and quartered.

Normally an England manager doesn't preside over a group stage exit.

This is because normally an England manager doesn't have two of the world's top ten teams in his group due to the fact that you are unseeded as a result of the poor performances of your predecessors.

We got out of a relatively tough group in Euro '12 - I'm quite sure Roy would have been able to get through USA, Algeria and Slovenia or Paraguay, Sweden and T&T.


Its no suprise to seem them defending Gerrard so vociferously.

Their greatest tricks are to overrate the contributions of our players compared with the foreigners whilst telling us that the opposite is happening "if a Brazilian did that we'd be raving about it" and to protect their favourites from all criticism whilst telling us that they "had to overcome their critics".

I think we all knew from Euro '04, Istanbul '05 and Benfica at Anfield the following season that he was never a CM.

An impact player whose legs have gone is not a playmaker - like Germany with Matthaus at sweeper in '94.

People will point to Liverpool's performances this season but they haven't had CL and he still cost them v Chelsea plus they managed without him at WHL.

Brilliant from The Times today about Harry Redknapp:

"Would probably make a fine tournament manager".

Interesting - what is their reasoning for this ?

There isn't any - its just that line: "Would probably make a fine tournament manager".

Ok then, if you say so.

Gerrard is probably a CM and could probably be our Pirlo.
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christmasborocooper

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by christmasborocooper on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:13 pm

But we all knew we weren't going to qualify. Everyone said from the off, if we get through the group it's a miracle. We know we're not very good. We were just hoping for some adventurous play... And we got some.


As for proving Liverpool fans wrong, let's remember :

"he'll never play anything but 4-4-2"
Plays alternate formations
"yeah well he'll always play defensively "
Doesn't
"yeah well he'll always pick the old boys"
Stars blooding the youth
"yeah well he won't take them to the world cup "
Takes them
" yeah well he won't start Sterling or Barkley etc "
Starts Sterling

I'd say, proved wrong ok
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Kimbo

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Kimbo on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:14 pm

I'm all for getting rid of Hodgson, he's had 2 poor tournaments, that is enough for any manager(and any player). Most countries would be looking for a change after that, and Greg Dyke clearly doesn't know what he's doing. Trying to deflect attention away from Gerrard is desperate though, he has been poor for England, yet people want him to stick around, how many caps do they want him to get? 130? 140? This is madness.
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bluenine

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by bluenine on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:19 pm

He makes perfect sense. I find it Shocking (with a capital S) that English U21 players refuse to go to U21 international tournaments. Such players should be banned from the NT, IMO. But from the sounds of it, the English NT actually encourages them in a way by shortlisting them for senior team. I remember an Italian U21 player (Pozzi I think) who needed finger surgery before Euro U21 decided to chop his finger off instead so that he could play in the tournament. Extreme example, I know, but it shows how seriously other countries look at the U21 team for developing talent. Most of Italy squad has been U21 internationals, apart from a few late bloomers. That is how it should be. Germany is the same.

National duty is national duty, no matter what age level. If you say no once, then you are just not committed enough. If I were the English coach, I would make it a point to only consider youngsters who perform at U21 level for England - it would set a great example, and build team spirit.

Pierre Littbarski wrote:What he has been saying for a while but still rings true...


'Other countries must look at England and laugh' - Stuart Pearce's damning verdict after Uruguay defeat

Stuart Pearce was one of the most passionate and committed players to pull on an England shirt and no one was hurting more than the former full-back after the defeat to Uruguay, which has left the Three Lions on the verge of an early World Cup exit.

For Pearce, the problems are all too clear, having continually expressed his frustration during his reign as Under-21 boss that young players are not being given enough tournament experience before making the step up to senior level.

Speaking to Adrian Durham in the aftermath of the 2-1 loss to a Luis Suarez-inspired Uruguay, a passionate Pearce admitted the result came as no surprise to him.

“For me, the answer never lies at major tournaments, it lies in the two years in between the major tournaments and how we approach the whole system, the education of our young players, the development of our young players,” he said.

“Five years ago our Under-21s played the German Under-21s in the European finals. I look at their team then and the one that lined up against Portugal in the World Cup. Six of their players from the Under-21s carried on their progression, stayed in the senior squad, and actually played against Portugal the other day.

“I looked at our squad [for the Under-21 European Championship five years ago] and out of that squad there were no players in our starting line-up that five years ago made the same journey. James Milner was in the squad and played but obviously didn’t get on the pitch the other day [against Uruguay] and Joe Hart ended up being suspended so possibly you could say two [did make the journey].

“Why last summer were 17 of our young players missing from an Under-21 tournament? It infuriates the life out of me.

“The worst thing you can say to me is, ‘in two years’ time this team will be decent’. It won't be unless you put the process in place that all of these players go to the Under-21 Championship next summer. So [Raheem] Sterling goes, so [Jack] Wilshere goes and [Phil] Jones goes - all those that are Under-21 and available."

According to Pearce, the decision to include Southampton's 18-year-old full-back Luke Shaw in the squad ahead of Ashley Cole shows just where we are going wrong.

“Before the tournament I was asked who we should take, Luke Shaw or Ashley Cole. Common sense says you take Cole because Shaw goes to the Toulon tournament, plays five games against the likes of Brazil and Mexico and plays in the Under-21 qualifier. It is common sense," he said.

“I’m not sure what he [Shaw] has learnt from this tournament, apart from Brazil is a great place to visit. I am not being facetious here. If you asked me, from a purely footballing point of view, I would say five games in Toulon would be a lot more beneficial at international level than not kicking a ball in Brazil.

“He might play the next game, we might go through the tournament, and I might be proved wrong. If I am wrong, brilliant. I hope I am. I hope someone pins me and says, ‘you were a million miles wrong, we carried on doing it the way we were and it has worked famously and we have won the World Cup’. But I base everything I do on looking at other nations around the world and they send more of their players to the younger tournaments. They go to the younger tournaments and win things more regularly than we do.

“We, as a nation, haven’t won anything for 60 years at senior level. We haven’t won anything at Under-21 level since 1984 and in those days there were only eight teams in Europe. Now, we have got all 52 teams entering Europe and it is very difficult to do.

“The Under-19s haven’t won anything for decades. The Under-17s are the only team over the last five years that have been successful. They have won the European Championship twice. I asked myself the question why and it’s because our best young players are available at that age group.

“It is when they go beyond the Under-17s that the clubs start pulling them out, we start upgrading them because our pool of players is that thin, we drag them up age groups, so in the end every player in the senior squad that doesn’t actually play is being taken out an age group below so it makes that weaker and weaker and weaker. It waters down the whole process and the end of it we get results like Uruguay."

Pearce also had the same problems with young players skipping international duty when he managed Team GB at the London Olympics.

And he continued: "If you look at the Olympics in isolation, I had players pull out the Olympic squad because they preferred to go on a pre-season tour with their clubs. And there was a clamour for me to put an individual within the Olympic team for political reasons, more so than probably football reasons.

"Other countries must look at us and laugh at times, they really must."
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Kimbo

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Kimbo on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:30 pm

Yeah lets force kids to go and spend their summers with people like Stuart Pearce and Gareth Southgate.  Erm
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Luis

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Luis on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:31 pm

christmasborocooper wrote:But we all knew we weren't going to qualify. Everyone said from the off, if we get through the group it's a miracle. We know we're not very good. We were just hoping for some adventurous play... And we got some.


As for proving Liverpool fans wrong, let's remember :

"he'll never play anything but 4-4-2"
Plays alternate formations
"yeah well he'll always play defensively "
Doesn't
"yeah well he'll always pick the old boys"
Stars blooding the youth
"yeah well he won't take them to the world cup "
Takes them
" yeah well he won't start Sterling or Barkley etc "
Starts Sterling

I'd say, proved wrong ok

It's nice that your expectations have been lowered so much that you think it's nice to just take part. Italy and Uruguay are nothing special, Costa Rica showed us that. We just feared them and Hodgson got out-thought twice. But he'd do exactly the same if he had his time over  Rolling Eyes 

Hodgson picked the right team (for the most part) but any old cabbage can pick the right team - it's getting the best out of them and making them believe.

We're no better than Ireland or Scotland under Roy in terms of mentality but long live the Hodge  <Ale> 
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Kimbo

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Kimbo on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:36 pm

Luis wrote:
christmasborocooper wrote:But we all knew we weren't going to qualify. Everyone said from the off, if we get through the group it's a miracle. We know we're not very good. We were just hoping for some adventurous play... And we got some.


As for proving Liverpool fans wrong, let's remember :

"he'll never play anything but 4-4-2"
Plays alternate formations
"yeah well he'll always play defensively "
Doesn't
"yeah well he'll always pick the old boys"
Stars blooding the youth
"yeah well he won't take them to the world cup "
Takes them
" yeah well he won't start Sterling or Barkley etc "
Starts Sterling

I'd say, proved wrong ok

It's nice that your expectations have been lowered so much that you think it's nice to just take part. Italy and Uruguay are nothing special, Costa Rica showed us that. We just feared them and Hodgson got out-thought twice. But he'd do exactly the same if he had his time over  Rolling Eyes 

Hodgson picked the right team (for the most part) but any old cabbage can pick the right team - it's getting the best out of them and making them believe.

We're no better than Ireland or Scotland under Roy in terms of mentality but long live the Hodge  <Ale> 

Be nice if our "captain" contributed there. Worst England captain in my lifetime.
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christmasborocooper

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by christmasborocooper on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:43 pm

Rooney said they were full of belief. Belief doesn't make them not shit.
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christmasborocooper

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by christmasborocooper on Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:44 pm

Luis wrote:
christmasborocooper wrote:But we all knew we weren't going to qualify. Everyone said from the off, if we get through the group it's a miracle. We know we're not very good. We were just hoping for some adventurous play... And we got some.


As for proving Liverpool fans wrong, let's remember :

"he'll never play anything but 4-4-2"
Plays alternate formations
"yeah well he'll always play defensively "
Doesn't
"yeah well he'll always pick the old boys"
Stars blooding the youth
"yeah well he won't take them to the world cup "
Takes them
" yeah well he won't start Sterling or Barkley etc "
Starts Sterling

I'd say, proved wrong ok

It's nice that your expectations have been lowered so much that you think it's nice to just take part. Italy and Uruguay are nothing special, Costa Rica showed us that. We just feared them and Hodgson got out-thought twice. But he'd do exactly the same if he had his time over  Rolling Eyes 

Hodgson picked the right team (for the most part) but any old cabbage can pick the right team - it's getting the best out of them and making them believe.

We're no better than Ireland or Scotland under Roy in terms of mentality but long live the Hodge  <Ale> 

Scotland and Ireland weren't at the world cup.
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Isco Benny

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Isco Benny on Sat Jun 21, 2014 3:06 pm

Another good point- our so called experienced players never showed up.

England Yet Again Let Down By The Men That Matter
At major tournaments all other countries have experienced players that turn up, but England's turn down. Daniel Storey is proud of the kids but angry at the rest...

"If you are really going to put him [Luis Suarez] up there with Maradona, Pele, Beckenbauer, Cruyff and Pirlo, this is the stage you have got to do it on. You can be a great player in your league but to be recognised as one of the all-time greats you have got to do it at the World Cup."

Roy Hodgson is not a man of many words, but he must be cursing uttering those particular sentiments three days before England took to the field against Uruguay. Luis Suarez is a brilliant enough footballer without the motivation to prove any opposition doubters wrong, but he did so in clinical and brilliant style against an England side now teetering on the brink of World Cup elimination.

Suarez is also dangerous enough without assisting his goals through unacceptable defensive generosity. The old cliché is that defence wins you championships, and England will surely head home from Brazil with such a sound-bite ringing in their ears - this has been a tough lesson of just how weak Roy Hodgson's side are in dealing with any invention or movement. There have been positive signs in attack during this opening week, but at times it felt like trying to run a bath without the plug secured, any hope of that well-earned soak washed away.

After the continued positivity following the defeat to Italy, the sad reality is that there isn't a single England player that could be pleased with their night's work against Uruguay. Despite the promises of brio and vibrancy from the start (as on Saturday), England seemed reserved as if somehow overawed by the magnitude of expectation. It is a great deal easier to play with carefree abandon in your first tournament game than your second, especially when the intricacies of qualification become all the more apparent.

There was a sense of self-doubt on Thursday evening that had been so refreshingly lacking in the Italy game. England seemed stifled on the ball, harried and hassled out of possession during the first half by Uruguay's high press, and then unable to break down the South Americans' resolute two banks of four when allowed to dominate possession and territory in the second.

For all the discussion of playing in Liverpool's easy-on-th- eye style, Hodgson's side instead resorted to hopeful crosses from deep (usually over-hit) and set-piece deliveries (usually under-hit), lacking any belief in the pass-and-move philosophy that had been so demanded in the build-up. They made 31 crosses in the match and yet didn't attempt a single through ball. For large periods this felt more like Bloemfontein 2010 than Manaus 2014.

The defenders are likely to receive the most censure from the inevitable fall-out. Phil Jagielka was caught ball-watching rather than tracking Suarez's run for the first and, ten yards from goal, there was only likely to be one end conclusion. The television pundits claimed that Edinson Cavani's cross "took five players out of the game", but in reality he merely aimed for the striker allowed to run free. And that striker scored. Because he's brilliant.

The full-backs, too, looked out-of-sorts and uncomfortable at the highest level. Mario Balotelli's goal on Saturday came from Leighton Baines' inability to put pressure on Antonio Candreva, and the same can be said of Glen Johnson against Cavani in the opening half hour. It may seem hyper-critical, but this is the World Cup - at the highest level anything less than exceptional is immediately made unsatisfactory because mistakes are so much more likely to be punished. Oh for Ashley Cole and Gary Neville.

However, the most striking conclusion to draw is that, once again, it is the senior players that have let England down. Look around at the other teams in the tournament: Robin van Persie and Arjen Robben for the Netherlands, Luis Suarez for Uruguay, Tim Cahill for Australia and Karim Benzema for France. Whilst every other country expects their best and most experienced players to turn up for a major tournament, once again England's have turned down.

Captain Steven Gerrard was a source of intense frustration, his tournament epitomised by the five stoppage time minutes on Thursday evening during which he over-hit a cross, got caught out of position and fired a shot comfortably wide with better options around him. He was imperious during the qualifying campaign, but when required to drag England through was left with nothing but the occasional Hollywood pass. His assist for Uruguay's second was bordering on unfortunate, but this is just another ending England career with many more troughs than peaks.

Wayne Rooney too, again flattered to deceive. He finally scored his first World Cup goal at the tenth time of asking, but shot straight at Fernando Muslera from close range and sent a header onto the bar from even pointer blank. Revolving the team around its potentially best player was an understandable move from Hodgson, but Rooney is another senior player that seems incapable of mirroring club form on the biggest of international stages.

It has been the same for too long. The two tournaments since Euro '96 in which England have created a sense of belief and hunger were World Cup '98 and Euro 2004, where 17-year-old Michael Owen and 18-year-old Wayne Rooney were the catalysts. Every other major country expects the inexperienced players to follow the example of the senior players, but in England we expect them to forge their own path whilst those experienced heads appear to be a mixture of unfit, unfresh or uninterested.

It's now become so entrenched in the psychology of our national team that we even tried to give it a positive spin in the build-up to Brazil. "It's brilliant because we have got lots of kids in the team," we claimed, a weak façade for the deduction that we simply had no-one else on which we could rely, several times bitten and twice shy over the belief that our experienced heads would step up to the plate.

Rather than expecting Rooney and Gerrard to deliver, we instead piled the pressure on Raheem Sterling and Daniel Sturridge. The Liverpool forward pair are perhaps the only two that can legitimately walk out of this tournament with their heads held high, and yet it is these two who will be inevitably left as the most tarnished, tarred by the brush of England sporting failure.

The likes of Sterling and Sturridge were never supposed to be our principal hopes, merely the supporting cast. And yet we have forced them into the limelight because the leading actors fluffed their lines yet again. It's beginning to grow very weary indeed.

All hope is not yet lost, and England could still progress through to the knock-out stage if results go their way. However, just like four years ago, it would simply be a prolonging of an inevitable ending. More fool us (again) for ever believing any differently

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Kimbo

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Kimbo on Sat Jun 21, 2014 3:10 pm

We should bring in Shawcross, Barton, and Carroll, give the team a bit of attitude and fight!!  <Ale> 
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Super Progress

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Super Progress on Sat Jun 21, 2014 3:50 pm

christmasborocooper wrote:But we all knew we weren't going to qualify. Everyone said from the off, if we get through the group it's a miracle. We know we're not very good. We were just hoping for some adventurous play... And we got some.


As for proving Liverpool fans wrong, let's remember :

"he'll never play anything but 4-4-2"
Plays alternate formations
"yeah well he'll always play defensively "
Doesn't
"yeah well he'll always pick the old boys"
Stars blooding the youth
"yeah well he won't take them to the world cup "
Takes them
" yeah well he won't start Sterling or Barkley etc "
Starts Sterling

I'd say, proved wrong ok
 ok 
I'm guesing part of the reason Roy is likely to stay is that increasingly the blame is going towards the players only. I hope he stays and keeps this younger side together. If he can drop Gerrard and perhaps Rooney then all the better.
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Kimbo

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Kimbo on Sat Jun 21, 2014 4:05 pm

I think Roy is getting far too much credit for playing younger players. The only one of the "golden generation" that he really chose not to take was Cole, which was a bad mistake. He has no option but to play younger players, for some reason the age bracket of 26-30(prime years) is almost a wasteland.
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Rosicky

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Rosicky on Sat Jun 21, 2014 4:36 pm

Who would we have as the manager if Woy went ?
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Kimbo

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Kimbo on Sat Jun 21, 2014 4:45 pm

Rosicky wrote:Who would we have as the manager if Woy went ?

Probably Redknapp. Not who I would go for but you know the London media would campaign for him.
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BoBo Vieri 32

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by BoBo Vieri 32 on Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:46 pm

England should get Spalletti or Zeman.
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debaser

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by debaser on Sat Jun 21, 2014 6:58 pm

BoBo Vieri 32 wrote:England should get Spalletti or Zeman.

don't think two managers who've essentially spent entire careers in Italy are ideal choices. if nothing else, media would be on their back from the start
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Kimbo

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Kimbo on Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:06 pm

Rafa would probably be a good but unpopular choice.
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bluenine

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by bluenine on Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:07 pm

BoBo Vieri 32 wrote:England should get Spalletti or Zeman.

Nah. Zeman is crazy. Spalletti is good, but he needs players with ball skills.

Guus Hiddink would have been a decent choice, but he is unavailable. SAF has retired, else he would have been good. Maybe Mancini - tactically limited, but he is good at getting a winning mentality into his team, which is basically what England needs... also, he likes strong, pacy players which England has aplenty. England do not have the DMs he needs, but I am sure he will "find" them.

Hodgson is just not good enough. Neither is Redknapp. I can understand the sentiment to see an English coach, but then don't have high expectations.
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Fey

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Fey on Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:17 pm

England need van Gaal!
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ERIK LAMELA

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by ERIK LAMELA on Sat Jun 21, 2014 10:00 pm

Sherwood.

Brian 2468

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Brian 2468 on Sun Jun 22, 2014 2:16 am

Best shot in the arm is for England to take off playing national football, give it a rest sit back and ponder for a while maybe miss the next tournament.  Smile    
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Roger Hunt

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Roger Hunt on Sun Jun 22, 2014 11:43 am

No question that Gerrard has had a poor tournament. Hope he retires from internationals, fed up with him coming back injured <Ale>

Increasingly we all seem to want to blame England's failures on a lack of willpower by the players. IMHO this is bollocks. We are increasingly shown up at top level by our technical shortcomings, specifically ball retention and passing. The answer to that is with the FAs shit development policy. They should take a leaf out of the Belgian's book.
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Deluded F*ck™

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Deluded F*ck™ on Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:08 pm

The FA don't have a player development policy - it's all about being quids in.
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Rosicky

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Rosicky on Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:21 pm

Roger Hunt wrote:No question that Gerrard has had a poor tournament. Hope he retires from internationals, fed up with him coming back injured <Ale>

Increasingly we all seem to want to blame England's failures on a lack of willpower by the players. IMHO this is bollocks. We are increasingly shown up at top level by our technical shortcomings, specifically ball retention and passing. The answer to that is with the FAs shit development policy. They should take a leaf out of the Belgian's book.

Is that still true?

After the round of games we had the 3rd best passing stats.

And i am pretty sure we bossed possession in both games.
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Deluded F*ck™

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Re: The Next England Squad

Post by Deluded F*ck™ on Sun Jun 22, 2014 12:29 pm

It's not overall stats that count.

You can have 30% possession and still be excellent with passing. 70% possession means shit if you are gouing backwards, and sideways with the odd Hollywood ball thrown in.

We're crap at passing between the lines, nearly as bad as the Africans (bar Ghana).

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