2014 World Cup Final

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bluenine

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by bluenine on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:06 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:Messi winning the golden ball is one of the most ridiculous things FIFA has pulled off. Ever.

I don't understand all this fuss about Messi winning the golden ball.

1. No one really cares about the Golden Ball. The World Cup is one of those rare events where the Golden Boot is far more prestigious than the best player award.

2. Some of the conspiracy theories are interesting, but don't stack up. FIFA has nothing to do with the Golden ball, apart from deciding the shortlist. Their shortlist was decent. The winner is decided by a media vote - which means that its always going to be a bit of a popularity contest.

3. This award is actually decided BEFORE the most important game of the tournament. So the performances in the final and the result have nothing to do with who wins this award. It is stupid, but that's how it is. Zidane won this award in 2006, despite his disgraceful headbutt in the final which lost France the World Cup.

Before the final, you can't really blame the media for voting with the assumption that Messi will make a difference in the final. Germany was a collective effort, the team was greater than the sum of individual parts. For Argentina, the individual efforts stood out more.

This award usually throws up a less deserving name, because of the way this is done. Like I said, no one really cares anyway.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:12 pm

That's a cliché, if anything. Argentina's game plan was at least as much about collective team effort (very compact and strong defending as a team, with the exception of one player) as Germany's was about individual brilliance. Germany had problems yesterday due to the pre-match shock of losing a very important player in the centre of the pitch and replacing him with someone who had played a few minutes in the cup so far. For long periods, Germany were not more than the sum of their parts yesterday, far from it. If they were, it would have been a far more one-sided contest, not taking anything away from Argentina who played their best match of the tournament yesterday.

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debaser

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by debaser on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:13 pm

Isco Benny wrote:Lukas Podolski doing a John Terry was the best moment of the night.

Runs onto pitch in full pristeen kit then manages to position himself next to Phillip Lahm for the big photo opp moment, getting his hands on the trophy first after the captain.

Germany owes Lukas big time. What a player!

haha I was thinking as I watched the celebrations that Podolski was John Terrying this one to the max lol!
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:15 pm

Poldi is a fucking legend, he can do whatever he wants. He is the team's mascot, so important for the team's spirit. They should reserve a spot for him until WC 2030.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:35 pm

So long and thanks for the memories, Brazil. We’ll never forget you

We came expecting protests and chaos. But the lasting legacy of 2014 will be the recasting of international football at the pinnacle of the sport and a new Wunderteam from Germany

Barney Ronay

Thank you Brazil, and goodbye. It’s been … emotional. After 32 days, 64 matches, 171 goals, 182 yellow cards, 48,706 passes, 2,124 tackles, $4bn in revenue for Fifa, plus of course an unceasing spume of digital opinion, a tsunami of public weeping and a mountain of deep-fried cheese pasties, the 2014 World Cup has now left the building.

Quite a bit has happened along the way. A European nation has become world champion on Latin American soil for the first time. Germany joined Italy as Brazil’s nearest all-time World Cup challengers. Miroslav Klose has dethroned Ronaldo as the most doggedly devastating goalscorer in World Cup history. And the World Cup’s hosts and holders have never been so soundly thrashed as Brazil and Spain were here, and this at a World Cup that still managed to produce the most classically old-school semi-final lineup yet, a VVIP gathering of the oligarchical powers.

At the end of which, after a tournament that was eight years and $11bn in the making, those four weeks in summer can now begin the familiar process of separating out in the memory into a concatenation of enduringly vivid moments.

This was a World Cup of bold, rich flavours, a heavily sauced affair that was at times almost a little too pungent for its own good. Never have so many tears been shed by so many athletes in such stunning high definition close-up. Never has so much incident, outrage and media-fanned obiter dicta successfully intruded from the fringes. Above all it has been a deeply sensory, even rather sensual World Cup. Just as the global TV audience swooned over the action and the tournament’s heavily marketed poster boys – J-Rod, Leo, C-Ron, Louis van G – so travelling around Brazil’s cities and stadiums was a brilliantly engaging experience.

This was the first tournament South American fans have travelled to in such numbers on their own continent. In the days leading up to the final, the streets of Rio were duly thronged with sozzled and boisterous Argentinians, the same supporters who had removed their shirts and staged celebratory fraternal fist fights in the stands in São Paulo after the victory against Switzerland.

Even England’s own shortlived travelling support could be seen dancing through the wee hours next to the opera house in Manaus, all driven along by the basic late-night, outdoorsy warmth of Brazil itself, ideal host for a genuinely engaging World Cup in one of the sport’s grand old footballing heartlands. It might be best to savour this while we can. Russia is up next, followed by the irresolvable wrong turn that is Qatar 2022. The World Cup is going outside now. It may be gone for some time.

For the hackneyed footballing romantic it is even tempting to detect some basic infectious Brazilian quality – the air, the light, the memory of the poor old long-dead jogo finito – in the excitement of the early stages. Either way the first week of Brazil 2014 came slathering out of the traps in a furious real-time montage of goals and attacking play. Group stages just aren’t supposed to look like this, but here the players pressed and counter-attacked to the limits of their physical capacities from the start. Holland’s 5-1 destruction of Spain will remain one of the great World Cup results. Germany thrashed a spooked and depleted Portugal in Salvador. France and Switzerland produced a breezy 5-2 romp, and overall by the end of the tournament’s first weekend the opening 14 matches had produced 44 goals.

It couldn’t last. It didn’t. The first 14 matches of the next phase brought just 31 goals, boosted by the isolated absurdity of Brazil’s annihilation in Belo Horizonte, as the best teams began to grind back down through the gears. By the end of the tournament the vogue for swift counter-attack had already begun to congeal into a wised-up retreat into deep-lying mutual counter-defence.

During Argentina’s semi-final with Holland, perhaps the most cautious match of the tournament, Alejandro Sabella’s team at times played a kind of 8-0-0-2, with Lionel Messi and Gonzalo Higuaín stationed miles from their retreating defence, lingering in the distance like fielders at long-on and long-off. And yet it would be wrong to say possession football went out of fashion at Brazil 2014: quite the opposite in fact, as the two teams who made the most passes contested the final. Similarly tiki-taka didn’t die – passing and keeping the ball will never go out of fashion – but instead failed to turn up in the first place as the reigning champions played not just like a tired team, but like a listless, even rather bored one.

Instead the dominant style at this World Cup was a kind of jogo collectivo, the familiar high-speed hustle and closing down of space that defines elite European club football. Helped by an excellent ball in the Brazuca – no wobbly moments, no flailing frango-howlers here – and refereeing that let the game flow to a fault at times, the general standard was high.

Although there are always exceptions. England had arguably their worst ever World Cup, a tournament that lasted five competitive days and ended with Roy Hodgson’s quietly hopeful squad bottom of Group D having outscored only Cameroon, Iran and Honduras at Brazil 2014. There is a theory England were unlucky, that playing their first match in the great steaming saucepan that was the Arena Amazônia mortally wounded them ahead of Uruguay four days later. This is wishful thinking.

England were just not good enough, exposed by playing two teams at the group stage of the same calibre that more often eliminates them in the knockout rounds. The players were short on small details – a lack of concentration in defence and precision in attack – but to blame the details is to avoid the great sweeping backstory of structural underachievement.

As Philip Larkin wrote in As Bad As A Mile …

“Watching the shied core

Striking the basket, skidding across the floor

Shows less and less of luck, and more and more

Of failure spreading back up the arm.”


Or in other words, the lads came up short – and will do the same again if nothing changes.

It was fairly clear what marked out the best teams at this World Cup. The more successful nations were those with coherent, productive domestic leagues, where the national association has a benevolent handle on how players are produced what the style and structure is going to be. Costa Rica, Holland, Germany, Belgium and Argentina benefited from players produced by a coherent domestic system, rather than the chaotic short-termism of England or, as it turns out, Brazil.

Indeed the only time the Premier League seemed tangibly present at this World Cup was when Luis Suárez bit Giorgio Chiellini in Natal, the familiar engines of drama and sentiment revved up and the English joined in the party, like teenagers at the disco leaping up at the end of the night when the DJ finally relents and puts some heavy metal on.

And what about the hosts anyway? In the end Brazil 2014 was both a PR disaster and a triumph, a shared sporting nightmare and a shared success; a triumph of stadium building fatally undermined by the spectacle of inadequate roads, housing and basic infrastructure that surrounded many of these high-spec space capsules.

Inside Brazil’s wet-paint mega-stadia the experience was slick enough, the staging spectacular, the relentless toadying, schmaltzified handshakes for peace, white doves of Blatter and all the rest of it familiarly inane. For this success no credit whatsoever must go to the spendthrift politicians and discredited organisers of Brazil 2014, but to the workers responsible for somehow sweating the whole thing into place and to the army of local volunteers who brightened and eased and smoothed what delays and hitches – the vanishing staircase, the neurotic fear of adequate signage – did show through.

As for the host team there is a separate treatise to be written on that extraordinary semi-final meltdown, when Brazil’s players didn’t so much lay the ghost of Barbosa from 1950 as become entirely possessed by his vengeful spirit – We Are All Barbosa! – stumbling about the pitch like boggle-eyed zombies. And a sense this World Cup witnessed the long-anticipated death of “Brazil” itself, the packing away for good of that historic warm-spirited football of the imagination, long since concreted in beneath the layers of professionalism and physicality.

Brazil has been criticised for the homogeneity of the crowds inside its stadiums, something that was always going to be the case from the moment it became clear only 400,000 of 3.3m tickets would be made available to ordinary Brazilians at affordable prices. Otherwise the crowds were just what you get at large scale sporting beanos everywhere: a collection of rich people.

Talking of which, even Fifa managed to emerge from this World Cup relatively unscathed, albeit from a position of already being pretty heavily scathed in the first place. In an interesting twist this was, in a sense, the tournament at which footballing chicanery came home, the culture of opaque wheeler-dealering having been entrenched at Fifa in the first place by the discredited Brazilians João Havelange and Ricardo Teixeira.

Football’s governing body remains a source of head-scratching bewilderment whatever the successes of this gripping World Cup; a tournament that beneath its many layers of drama and obfuscation confirmed that for all the noisy excitements of club football there is a purity about the international game that remains its distinct and distinguishing feature.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/jul/14/brazil-world-cup-memories-legacy-2014

Ale
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 2:29 pm

World Cup final 2014: five talking points from Germany 1-0 Argentina

Joachim Löw enjoys his crowning glory, epitomised by Mario Götze, as Argentina test a rejigged midfield but miss the target

1 Golden goal showed sheer quality of Götze’s generation

How fitting that a fourth star to adorn Germany’s shirt, a star that was more than a decade in the making, should be etched by a moment of such classic refinement. Götze’s matchwinner had the drama of a golden goal – and it was greeted in such a fashion as the entire German bench pelted on to the pitch to celebrate around the centre circle, as if they were sure it was game over. But it also had the sheen of quality that Germany have been honing in their players for years. Fatigue had naturally crept in when Andre Schürrle’s burst down the flank sparked a tired team to life. Götze’s blend of sharpness and pure technique was stunning. In the motion of cushioning the ball he was already positioning his body to propel a wonderful volley past Sergio Romero. Götze had not enjoyed the most prolific tournament but the 22-year-old seized his moment with a goal to dazzle for his entire generation.

2 Victory was the moment of truth for Joachim Löw

Two elements of Löw’s reputation as a renaissance man and a nearly man collided here in Rio. His standing absolutely hinged on whether he could deliver. Handed charge of this generation of beautifully trained, sophisticated footballers, he took up position in the dugout of the Maracanã knowing anything less than the chance to cradle the trophy would be a failure, after reaching four consecutive semi-finals in major tournaments since taking over from Jürgen Klinsmann. This turned out to be quite a test of his mettle after such a rampant statement of intent in the semi-final against Brazil. He was severely tested as a number of small spanners hit the German works. Untimely injuries called for adjustments and Argentina unpicked the defence far too often for comfort. All the tension dissolved as the final whistle blew on a victory for modern German football. For a man who had previously had only the Austrian Football Bundesliga title with Tirol Innsbruck and the German DFB-Pokal cup with Stuttgart to trumpet, how sweet it must have been to add the World Cup to his curriculum vitae.

3 Argentina went for the bold approach but were off target

Alejandro Sabella’s men approached the game with more bravery going forward than was the template for a restrictive, cautious, long-game plan in the semi-final against Holland. They bore down on Manuel Neuer’s goal with real intent on several occasions. But the brutal and painful statistic that speaks volumes is the fact that they did not manage a shot on target. The last time that happened to them in a World Cup match was the 1990 final defeat by Germany, as it happens. Gonzalo Higuaín’s effort in the first half, when he was presented with an unexpected gift from Toni Kroos’s ill conceived back pass, was tossed away wastefully. Lionel Messi, who looked too exhausted and shorn of energy to be decisive, made the Maracanã hold its breath just after half-time, only to steer wide. Ezequiel Lavezzi, who had played with such brio, was taken off at half-time and Sergio Agüero struggled for the space to pounce. The more Argentina’s bold attackers missed their target, the more vulnerable they were to a killer moment at the other end. In the end they trailed for only seven minutes of this whole World Cup.

4 Midfield rejigs were a sore test for Germany’s resources

Their preparation could scarcely have been more perfect in the build-up to this final ... until an injury in the warm-ups to their midfield cornerstone, Sami Khedira, called for a sudden replacement. It was a remarkable moment for Christoph Kramer. Not many players get to make a first competitive start for their country at a World Cup final. He did not last until half-time, though, having suffered concussion, which required yet another midfield reshuffle. It was awkward, with Shürrle coming on to play more offensively and Kroos not so comfortably drifting back. Bastian Schweinsteiger was inspiring in holding the heartland together. Germany’s persistence, and their belief in their fundamental qualities, saw them through.

5 For Messi the debate about his greatness will continue

For some there is no debate. The wondrous attacker who has provided so many highlights and broken so many records is beyond such polemics. For others he needed to emulate Diego Maradona and drag his team to a World Cup triumph to finalise his position in the game’s pantheon. His desolate expression as he was awarded the Golden Ball for best player of the tournament gave an eloquent view on what was on his mind. No personal gain was even relevant in the aftermath of coming so close. Messi had his moments in this World Cup, most notably in the group stage, in which he propelled Argentina onwards. But in the toughest knockout matches he was nullified. He could not do it alone.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/jul/14/germany-argentina-world-cup-final-2014-talking-points
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Super Progress

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Super Progress on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:15 pm

Jaime wrote:
Effenberg wrote:I'm supremely happy, obviously. Ale

Congrats mate! Same to Kroos, Antarion, Otto, etc. Ale
 <Ale>  <Ale>  <Ale> 


Kroos wrote:

seriously i never would have thought that i wouldn`t be happy not to see khedira playing, but it was a huge shock for me, 5 min before the game starts such bad news, i was in really bad mood

Same here  Biggrin 

blutgraetsche wrote:Messi failed to show up in most of the knock-out stages, he really wasn't better than Mascherano yesterday, that's just wrong. I didn't want to say that Mascherano was the tournament's best player, he clearly wasn't, but if the price is given as a consolation, which it apparently is, he would have been the more deserving Argentina player. The tournament really starts in the knock-out stages, that's where the truly great players show up.

Plus, it's easier to look good when you have the team built around you, when you are allowed to stay up for most of the match, conserving energy while running as much as Fred did, letting the rest of the team work their arse off for you. That's jst pure anachronism, and it's egoistic, especially if he doesn't pull off Maradona-esque performances in the knock-out stages where it counts to justify it.
 ok 
I wonder how fit Messi really was and in what mental state. Never thought I would feel bad for the guy but the way he just faded out of the game and then that stare at the end. I don't particularly care about the award and especially because it will produce such a backlash anyway just like in 2010 when Snejider missed out.

Argentina was the better team in the final imo and surprisingly so. They should have won with their chances which were huge chances. Can't recall Germany having a single 100% chance and imo Argentina had 3. This was probably the best final I have seen in terms of good chances to both sides although it clearly died out after the first 10 mins or so in the second half.
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messiah

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by messiah on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:21 pm

Super Progress wrote:
Jaime wrote:
Effenberg wrote:I'm supremely happy, obviously. Ale

Congrats mate! Same to Kroos, Antarion, Otto, etc. Ale
 <Ale>  <Ale>  <Ale> 


Kroos wrote:

seriously i never would have thought that i wouldn`t be happy not to see khedira playing, but it was a huge shock for me, 5 min before the game starts such bad news, i was in really bad mood

Same here  Biggrin 

blutgraetsche wrote:Messi failed to show up in most of the knock-out stages, he really wasn't better than Mascherano yesterday, that's just wrong. I didn't want to say that Mascherano was the tournament's best player, he clearly wasn't, but if the price is given as a consolation, which it apparently is, he would have been the more deserving Argentina player. The tournament really starts in the knock-out stages, that's where the truly great players show up.

Plus, it's easier to look good when you have the team built around you, when you are allowed to stay up for most of the match, conserving energy while running as much as Fred did, letting the rest of the team work their arse off for you. That's jst pure anachronism, and it's egoistic, especially if he doesn't pull off Maradona-esque performances in the knock-out stages where it counts to justify it.
 ok 
I wonder how fit Messi really was and in what mental state. Never thought I would feel bad for the guy but the way he just faded out of the game and then that stare at the end. I don't particularly care about the award and especially because it will produce such a backlash anyway just like in 2010 when Snejider missed out.

Argentina was the better team in the final imo and surprisingly so. They should have won with their chances which were huge chances. Can't recall Germany having a single 100% chance and imo Argentina had 3. This was probably the best final I have seen in terms of good chances to both sides although it clearly died out after the first 10 mins or so in the second half.

I agree on both counts, a fit messi would probably have won it for them
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:27 pm

No, they weren't. Argentina didn't have a single shot on goal. What use is a "chance" when you can't even aim for the goal? Plus, the Higuain chance was served to them on a silver platter, for example, it's not like they really 'created' that much.

Germany was clearly the more pro-active team and had quite a few chances themselves. Höwedes hit the post from two yards for Christ sake! Revisionism at it's best, but fortunately, only a very small minority saw the match that way.
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messiah

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by messiah on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:34 pm

the higuian chance, the kroos gave him
The other chance where he was stupidly offside
I think he had another too, I'm not sure
The messi chance
The Palacios chance

The only clear cut shop germany had was Howedes nothing else.

German where the more pro-active side, but argentina and their shit progressive football had the better chances through he first 90 minutes and equal chances in extra time, One for both teams palacio for argentina, Gotze for german.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:37 pm

The only clear cut chance was Höwedes? How many saves did Romero make, and how many Neuer. Enough said.

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messiah

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by messiah on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:42 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:The only clear cut chance was Höwedes? How many saves did Romero make, and how many Neuer. Enough said.


Your just so happy germany won you can't see it.

Even the presenters on ESPN, who are not some american presenters, agreed that argentina had the better of the game, as it relates to chances had and that they implemented their game plan better.

Romero had simple saves, apart from the Howedes header, none of the german shots were dangerous.

Argentina where just god damn awful infront of goal, in had nothing to do with Neuers's "presence" they were just horrible, the occasion got to them I guess, but the still had the better chances in the game.

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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:45 pm

It was an even match with two contrasting styles. Argentina clearly profited from the confusion the Khedira injury caused in Germany's midfield, they played really well, their best match in the tournament without a doubt. They could have won the match when they had used their chances better, but they simply did not, far from it, they didn't even have a shot on goal!

But trying to paint a picture as if the better team didn't win yesterday is a bit rich. It did, Germany were the better team over 120 minutes and deservedly won.
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Kimbo

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Kimbo on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:48 pm

I thought Germany were the better team overall, it was probably quite even in terms of chances, but I got the feeling that Germany's chances were being created while Argentina's were just falling to them. I was always pretty confident the Krauts were going to win.
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messiah

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by messiah on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:50 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:It was an even match with two contrasting styles. Argentina clearly profited from the confusion the Khedira injury caused in Germany's midfield, they played really well, their best match in the tournament without a doubt. They could have won the match when they had used their chances better, but they simply did not, far from it, they didn't even have a shot on goal!

But trying to paint a picture as if the better team didn't win yesterday is a bit rich. It did, Germany were the better team over 120 minutes and deservedly won.

And germany didn't benefit from DI maria not being their, you act as if only german were missing players, if anything Di maria was a much bigger miss for argentina and in the first 90 minutes argentina were the better side

I didn't say germany didn't deserve to win, they did.

But they were better than argentina.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:52 pm

The difference is that Argentina knew that they couldn't play Di Maria due to injury and could plan accordingly. Di Maria had already missed the semis btw. Germany had to improvise 10 minutes before the match started, that's something completely different.

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messiah

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by messiah on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:55 pm

german where the better team after the 65th minute or there about, when the stupid sub by sebella to take of Lavezzi for Kun started to show, Lavezzi was stretching the German defense, Kun did just all.

against as the commentators noted, the argentine subs added nothing to the game, the team got worst with each substitute.

but before than, argentina's game plan was being better implemented

Was lavezzi Injured?
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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Jaime on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:57 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:It was an even match with two contrasting styles. Argentina clearly profited from the confusion the Khedira injury caused in Germany's midfield, they played really well, their best match in the tournament without a doubt. They could have won the match when they had used their chances better, but they simply did not, far from it, they didn't even have a shot on goal!

But trying to paint a picture as if the better team didn't win yesterday is a bit rich. It did, Germany were the better team over 120 minutes and deservedly won.

And I think it would be hard for anyone to argue that Germany wasn't the best team over the course of the whole tournament.

That said, Germany benefited even more than Argentina because of Khedira's injury.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:59 pm

Lavezzi was simply finished (probably even injured), he had no gas left in the tank, that was pretty obvious. Don't think that you can really blame Sabella for it.

Fact of the matter is that after losing the inexperienced Kramer also, Löw had the balls to do an attacking sub in Schürrle. That was quite a big risk, as Argentina were putting a lot of pressure on his team during that period. Germany played with a more attacking formation as a consequence (Schürrle moved to the left, Müller stayed on the right and Özil in the hole, Kroos back to central midfield). It was a key moment in the game, it won us the game in combination with the Götze sub later on.


Last edited by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:06 pm; edited 1 time in total
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:04 pm

Jaime wrote:
That said, Germany benefited even more than Argentina because of Khedira's injury.

You really hate him, don't you? Laughing He had a great world cup, can't deny that. Germany clearly missed him yesterday, especially Kroos missed him. If Real sign Kroos, they better make sure that they have somebody athletic covering for him, even if it's not Khedira...
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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Jaime on Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:13 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:
Jaime wrote:
That said, Germany benefited even more than Argentina because of Khedira's injury.

You really hate him, don't you? Laughing He had a great world cup, can't deny that. Germany clearly missed him yesterday, especially Kroos missed him. If Real sign Kroos, they better make sure that they have somebody athletic covering for him, even if it's not Khedira...

Hahaha he probably has the disadvantage of being one of Jose's favourites. He looked good against Brazil but I would have looked good against Brazil on that day.
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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Fey on Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:16 pm

Antarion wrote:@Fey: for me winning the world cup is much better than CL for bayern. i know several bayern fans who would disagree though.

Yeah, I would totally go for a CL...because that is so far away for me, even dreaming about it doesnt make sense.

Hell, I can see Holland winning a cup before Feyenoord win the league Laughing

110%

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by 110% on Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:18 pm

bluenine wrote:
blutgraetsche wrote:Messi winning the golden ball is one of the most ridiculous things FIFA has pulled off. Ever.

I don't understand all this fuss about Messi winning the golden ball.

1. No one really cares about the Golden Ball. The World Cup is one of those rare events where the Golden Boot is far more prestigious than the best player award.

2. Some of the conspiracy theories are interesting, but don't stack up. FIFA has nothing to do with the Golden ball, apart from deciding the shortlist. Their shortlist was decent. The winner is decided by a media vote - which means that its always going to be a bit of a popularity contest.

3. This award is actually decided BEFORE the most important game of the tournament. So the performances in the final and the result have nothing to do with who wins this award. It is stupid, but that's how it is. Zidane won this award in 2006, despite his disgraceful headbutt in the final which lost France the World Cup.

Before the final, you can't really blame the media for voting with the assumption that Messi will make a difference in the final. Germany was a collective effort, the team was greater than the sum of individual parts. For Argentina, the individual efforts stood out more.

This award usually throws up a less deserving name, because of the way this is done. Like I said, no one really cares anyway.

FIFA should have given the award to Yaya (since no-one cares about it), to prove that we're not all racist

110%

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by 110% on Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:24 pm

Kimbo wrote:I thought Germany were the better team overall, it was probably quite even in terms of chances, but I got the feeling that Germany's chances were being created while Argentina's were just falling to them. I was always pretty confident the Krauts were going to win.

 <Ale> 

Both teams looked dangerous and it was a very entertaining 0-0, but yeah argentina were hitting on the break into space so their chances might look better, whereas the Germans were trying to create chances against a packed defence. I had the feeling that the Germans could up the tempo and were even saving themselves at a certain point for extra time. Whereas I knew that if Argentina conceded the game would be over because they were playing at their max.

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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 4:42 pm

This is just for you Jaime...


Sami Khedira is one of just 10 players ever to win the CL / European Cup and WC in the same year:


Sami Khedira (Real Madrid/Germany, 2014)

Roberto Carlos (Real Madrid/Brazil, 2002)

Christian Karembeu (Real Madrid/France, 1998)

Sepp Maier (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Paul Breitner (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Hans-Georg Schwarzenbeck (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Franz Beckenbauer (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Gerd Müller (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Uli Hoeneß (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Jupp Kapellmann (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)


cheers

Formerly known as sheva7

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Formerly known as sheva7 on Mon Jul 14, 2014 7:32 pm

Argentinian press is saying that Neuer committed a penalty against Higuain. I don't think so. He touched the ball and then there was a normal contact. Your thoughts?
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Fey

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Fey on Mon Jul 14, 2014 7:46 pm

Not a penalty, because he doesnt take a scoring oppertunity away from Higuain. Yellow for sure, but im still doubting on a red perhaps even.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 7:59 pm

Not a penalty, it's nonsense. It wasn't a red card either, as he hit the ball first, he can't just disappear. Higuain took that risk on purpose, shouldn't complain.
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Jaime

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Jaime on Mon Jul 14, 2014 8:12 pm

It doesn't have to take a goalscoring opportunity to be penalty, but I agree that in this case Neuer touches the ball first and the collision happens second. Not a penalty.
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Jaime

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

Post by Jaime on Mon Jul 14, 2014 8:14 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:This is just for you Jaime...


Sami Khedira is one of just 10 players ever to win the CL / European Cup and WC in the same year:


Sami Khedira (Real Madrid/Germany, 2014)

Roberto Carlos (Real Madrid/Brazil, 2002)

Christian Karembeu (Real Madrid/France, 1998)

Sepp Maier (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Paul Breitner (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Hans-Georg Schwarzenbeck (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Franz Beckenbauer (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Gerd Müller (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Uli Hoeneß (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)

Jupp Kapellmann (Bayern München/Germany, 1974)


cheers

Muller, Beckenbaur, Roberto Carlos....Khedira. lol!

Anyhow, Madrid were losing the match until he left the pitch. Germany won the final without him on the pitch. I think I don't need to say anything else. Biggrin

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Re: 2014 World Cup Final

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