DIE WELTMEISTER!!

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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Wed Jul 09, 2014 12:52 pm

He'll break Klose's record. Ale

Other stats / records, just for you Antarion:


World Cup records tumble as Germany destroy Brazil 7-1

• Semi-final in Belo Horizonte sees series of new marks set
• Germany become the biggest scorers in tournament history


Germany’s destruction of Brazil in Belo Horizonte on Tuesday night obliterated several long-standing World Cup records.

Never in the 84-year history of the tournament has a team scored seven times in a semi-final, with Joachim Löw’s side surpassing the previous record form the 1930 World Cup when both Argentina and Uruguay won their respective matches 6-1.

There was also personal glory for Miroslav Klose, who became the leading scorer in World Cup history with 16 goals.

179
Seconds between Germany’s second and fourth goals in Belo Horizonte

7
Germany are first side to score seven times in a World Cup semi-final

94
Years since Brazil lost by a six-goal margin (6-0 to Uruguay in 1920)

29
Minutes it took Germany to score five, the fastest ever at a World Cup

16
Goals scored by Miroslav Klose at World Cups, beating Ronaldo’s record

5
The amount of goals scored by England in the past two World Cups

223
Number of goals scored by Germany at World Cups. Brazil have 221

3-0
Brazil’s heaviest defeat at a World Cup before last night, in 1998

12
World Cup matches it took Thomas Müller to get to 10 goals

6
Number of assists provided by the Bayern player in those 12 games

0
Shots on target by Luiz Felipe Scolari’s side in the first half

69
Seconds between Toni Kroos’ two goals. Fastest in tournament history

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/jul/09/world-cup-records-germany-brazil
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Wed Jul 09, 2014 1:01 pm

Germany must capitalise on super win

Posted by Raphael Honigstein

7-1.

It was a historic result in Belo Horizonte, probably the most outrageous scoreline that will ever be recorded in World Cup football.

But Germany's aim -- make that their absolute, fundamental need -- will be to make sure they won't just be remembered for that "miracle" against a shell-shocked, completely devastated Brazil.

Joachim Low's men, however, have to come home with more than happy memories of a semifinal win.

You could see it in the faces of the players of the final whistle. They almost felt sorry for beating the Selecao by such a exuberant margin. They didn't take pleasure in inflicting this amount of pain. They just wanted to get the job done.

Celebrations, euphoria? No, thanks.

"A bit of humility is in order now," said a very collected Low. "We move on. We have to make sure we will stay focused."

Thomas Muller, too, pleaded for a sense of perspective. "After the Algeria game, they slaughtered us," said the Bayern forward and scorer of the all-important first goal. "Now they want to elevate us to the heavens. That's the wrong approach. We are simply a pretty good team."

Muller, 24, probably meant it. Germany are a pretty good team. Just doing their thing, playing at an acceptable level. They can still play better. In all likelihood, they will have to play better on Sunday in Rio.

In that assessment, there was the recognition that Brazil had made it easy by losing their heads and running into an "open knife," as the saying in Germany goes.

All Muller & Co. had to do was watch Luiz Felipe Scolari's rudderless, overawed side impale themselves. After the fourth or fifth goal, the law of diminishing returns kicked in.

The six Bayern Munich players on the pitch for Germany (Manuel Neuer, Jerome Boateng, Toni Kroos, Bastian Schweinsteiger, Philipp Lahm and Thomas Muller) would have recognised the symptoms: with every additional goal, your achievement becomes smaller, along with the perceived level of quality of the opposition.

This Brazil team were still Brazil, however -- in Brazil. General manager Oliver Bierhoff had described Germany's chances to win the World Cup in South America as virtually impossible not long ago, and a lot of people had bought into the argument.

Low had dared to disagree at the time, but only quietly. Now, it's no longer a question whether they win but whether they'll somehow not win it. Whoever joins them in the final will be ranked outsiders. That will present its own challenges. But this wasn't the night to start worrying about that.

By the end of the 90 minutes in Belo Horizonte, it was churlish to think of this game as revenge for the 2-0 defeat in the 2002 final. There had been no account to settle to begin with. A very different Brazil won in Yokohama against a very different Germany team.

Rudi Voller's team didn't expect to make it that far. They shouldn't have made it that far. They got to the final by the skin of their teeth and a series of 1-0 wins (versus USA, Paraguay, South Korea), thanks to an inspired Oliver Kahn in goal, the inspirational captain Michael Ballack, and a disciplined, selfless supporting cast who ran, toiled, ran and toiled.

Nobody really thought they should beat the Brazil of Ronaldo, Rivaldo and Ronaldinho. Ironically, Voller's team played their best game of the tournament and nearly caused an upset but upon their return, they were feted like plucky underdogs, enjoyable losers who had done the best with the limited possibilities at their disposal. You don't cry for revenge when you know that your defeat was fully deserved.

The 7-1 win over the same opponents in what was only the second meeting at this level was not payback, nor retribution, nor did it have much to do with Brazil at all.

By reaching their first World Cup final since 2002, a random semi-success sandwiched in between the worst tournament performances since World War II (Euro 2000, Euro 2004), they have done something a bit bigger: They've reestablished themselves at a level and status that they last enjoyed 20 years ago.

This Germany, this "pretty good team," are back at the very top of international football. The uncertain, unnerving times of decline (1990-1998), of stagnation (2002), of fragile renaissance (2006) and unfinished improvement (2010-2012) are over.

Low's Germany no longer have to wonder where they're going. They have arrived. All that's left to do now is to make sure that they don't come down from the historic highs of this tournament empty-handed.

http://www.espnfc.com/team/germany/481/blog/post/1940562/raphael-honigstein-germany-must-capitalise-on-their-superb-semifinal-win-over-brazil
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Fey

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by Fey on Wed Jul 09, 2014 4:55 pm

The Allezdian wrote:Best World Cup performance ever? Brazil humiliated themselves, not Germany

Germany’s 7-1 thrashing of Brazil on Tuesday will go down as arguably the most stunning result in World Cup history.

World Cup semi-finals are almost always very tight and tense affairs. The last time a last-four clash was won by more than one goal in 90 minutes was 28 years ago when Diego Maradona led Argentina to a 2-0 success over Belgium at Mexico ’86.

Before the game, Brazil were marginal favourites – despite losing their two best players, Neymar and Thiago Silva, to injury and suspension respectively. They had not lost a competitive game at home since 1975 and with the whole country behind them it seemed that nothing could stop the Selecao in their quest for a sixth world title.

For Germany to not only beat Brazil in their own backyard, but to register one of the highest margins of victory at a World Cup finals is almost impossible to believe.

"That was football from another galaxy," gushed DFB president Wolfgang Niersbach.

But how much credit do Germany really deserve?

Granted, Joachim Low got his tactics spot on with Germany’s pressing and counter-attacking picking Brazil apart time and again. Low must also be praised for swallowing his pride after the second round scare against Algeria and restoring Philipp Lahm to his rightful position at full back. The decision to drop Per Mertesacker further tightened the backline.

Germany were ruthless in the attacking third – bringing back memories of the great West German sides of the seventies and eighties when the likes of Gerd Muller, Wolfgang Overath and Karl-Heinz Rummenigge would show opponents no mercy. Thomas Muller and new World Cup record scorer Miroslav Klose certainly fall into a similar category.

But the hard truth is that the reason why Germany inflicted such a humiliation on their hosts was because Brazil were an utter shambles. Sunday League players would be ashamed to perform at such an abominable level.

Germany did not have to work for their goals – they were given to them. David Luiz and Dante may as well have been wearing white shirts so embarrassing was their defending on almost all of the seven strikes. Fernandinho gifted Toni Kroos his first goal straight from the restart as if it had been pre-planned.

“You have to give Germany credit, but the truth is that it was a woeful, woeful performance from Brazil. In 40 years I have never seen anything like it,” Liverpool legend Alan Hansen, who played against Tele Santana's wonderful Brazil side of Zico, Socrates and Falcao at the 1982 World Cup, told the BBC.

Had the Europeans dismantled an outstanding opponent, then they would deserve every superlative thrown their way. But this is the most talentless Brazil team that has ever appeared at a World Cup.

A Brazil squad whose two centre-forwards are Fred and Jo. A squad whose right back, Maicon, is so past-it that he is left gasping for breath after the first five minutes. A squad with midfielders, like Ramires and Paulinho, who can't even pass the ball five yards square. A squad containing reserves from QPR, Napoli and Spurs. A squad which includes a host of sub-par players who were picked by Luiz Felipe Scolari solely for personal rather than professional reasons.

Die Mannschaft deserve credit for such an historic result, and this golden generation of Bastian Schweinsteiger, Lahm and Klose certainly merits a trophy before they retire, but let’s get real – the big story here is that Brazil were an embarrassment.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Wed Jul 09, 2014 5:39 pm

It's always the same when it comes to the German national team - it's never them who have been good, it's the opponent who disgraced themselves. You will never read anything like that about the drubbing Spain got in the group stages by Holland, for example.

Nothing new there, move along, particularly not from an Italian writer. But that's ok, it's not even worth considering, as there is a far more important task ahead.
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Antarion

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by Antarion on Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:02 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:He'll break Klose's record. Ale

Other stats / records, just for you Antarion:


World Cup records tumble as Germany destroy Brazil 7-1

• Semi-final in Belo Horizonte sees series of new marks set
• Germany become the biggest scorers in tournament history


Germany’s destruction of Brazil in Belo Horizonte on Tuesday night obliterated several long-standing World Cup records.

Never in the 84-year history of the tournament has a team scored seven times in a semi-final, with Joachim Löw’s side surpassing the previous record form the 1930 World Cup when both Argentina and Uruguay won their respective matches 6-1.

There was also personal glory for Miroslav Klose, who became the leading scorer in World Cup history with 16 goals.

179
Seconds between Germany’s second and fourth goals in Belo Horizonte

7
Germany are first side to score seven times in a World Cup semi-final

94
Years since Brazil lost by a six-goal margin (6-0 to Uruguay in 1920)

29
Minutes it took Germany to score five, the fastest ever at a World Cup

16
Goals scored by Miroslav Klose at World Cups, beating Ronaldo’s record

5
The amount of goals scored by England in the past two World Cups

223
Number of goals scored by Germany at World Cups. Brazil have 221

3-0
Brazil’s heaviest defeat at a World Cup before last night, in 1998

12
World Cup matches it took Thomas Müller to get to 10 goals

6
Number of assists provided by the Bayern player in those 12 games

0
Shots on target by Luiz Felipe Scolari’s side in the first half

69
Seconds between Toni Kroos’ two goals. Fastest in tournament history

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/jul/09/world-cup-records-germany-brazil

STATS  cheers 
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Antarion

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by Antarion on Wed Jul 09, 2014 8:03 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:It's always the same when it comes to the German national team - it's never them who have been good, it's the opponent who disgraced themselves. You will never read anything like that about the drubbing Spain got in the group stages by Holland, for example.

Nothing new there, move along, particularly not from an Italian writer. But that's ok, it's not even worth considering, as there is a far more important task ahead.


Ah don't care. You will always find different news everywhere. I don't give a shit. Was one of the best nights of football i remember.  cheers 
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Thu Jul 10, 2014 4:00 pm

Auf Kante genäht

Bundestrainer Joachim Löw hat vor der WM eine gewagte Rechnung aufgemacht und nicht fitte Spieler wie Sami Khedira, Bastian Schweinsteiger und Miroslav Klose mit zur WM genommen. Das Risiko scheint sich gelohnt zu haben.

Wenn Deutschland Weltmeister wird, bekommen Günter Herrmann, Paul Steiner und Frank Mill bald Nachfolger. Denn so wie es aussieht, werden Kevin Großkreutz, Erik Durm und Matthias Ginter die einzigen Feldspieler sein, die bei dieser WM nicht eingesetzt wurden.

Die Ersatztorhüter müssen schon vor Turnierbeginn damit leben, dass sie wahrscheinlich die WM auf der Bank verbringen und ihr Einsatz nur im Training und im Teamquartier an der Tischtennisplatte oder am Billardtisch gefragt ist.

Aber Großkreutz und Durm waren nicht als klassische Reservisten nach Brasilien gereist, beide durften sich nach der Bekanntgabe des WM-Kaders auch berechtigte Hoffnungen machen, eine nicht ganz unerhebliche Rolle in diesem Turnier zu spielen.

Radikales Umdenken

Doch dann entschied sich Joachim Löw dafür, auf Außenverteidiger im klassischen Sinn bei dieser WM zu verzichten - zumindest bis zur Rückversetzung von Kapitän Philipp Lahm auf die Position des Rechtsverteidigers.

Es war ein radikales Umdenken, das Löw auch mit einer klaren Vorstellung verbunden hatte. Offensive Außenverteidiger seien aufgrund der extremen Bedingungen in Brasilien nicht erforderlich. Außer Deutschland hat keine Mannschaft so gedacht und auch Löw hat sich im Laufe des Turniers zumindest ansatzweise korrigiert.

Löw musste Zeit gewinnen

Die Abwehrkette mit vier Innenverteidigern mag eine unkonventionelle Idee von Löw gewesen sein, es war aber auch immer klar, dass er darüber auch nur nachdenken musste, weil es ihm seit Jahren an tauglichen Außenverteidigern fehlt. Die Umstellung war aus der Not heraus geboren.

Großkreutz und Durm haben bei Borussia Dortmund gute Spiele gemacht als Außenverteidiger, aber gelernt haben sie diese Position erst in den letzten Monaten unter Jürgen Klopp. Beide kommen von offensiveren Positionen und füllen die Verteidigerpositionen im Dortmunder Spiel auch entsprechend aus.

Beide passen ins System Klopp, aber passen sie auch in die Nationalmannschaft? Löw beantwortete die Frage mit Nein. Er verfolgte einen anderen Gedanken. Er wollte die Defensive stärken und Zeit gewinnen. Zeit, die er für die völlige Regeneration einiger angeschlagener Spieler brauchte.

Gewagtes Spiel

Bastian Schweinsteiger, Sami Khedira und Miroslav Klose durften die Reise nach Brasilien antreten, während Mario Gomez wegen mangelnder Fitness zuhause bleiben musste.

Es war ein gewagtes Spiel, das Löw mit seiner Nominierungstaktik einging. Die größten Zweifel gab es bei Khedira, der nach seinem Kreuzbandriss Mitte November erst kurz zuvor sein Comeback gefeiert hatte.

"Er ist zurzeit natürlich nicht am Leistungslimit, aber wir sind überzeugt, ihn dahin zu bringen", sagte Löw. Der Bundestrainer wollte auf die Persönlichkeit Khedira und dessen Erfahrung nicht verzichten und sprach davon, ein "kalkuliertes Risiko" eingegangen zu sein.

Es wurde eine große Rechenaufgabe daraus, nachdem im Trainingslager in Südtirol auch noch Philipp Lahm und Manuel Neuer mit Verletzungen Sorgen bereiteten und Lars Bender sowie Marco Reus das WM-Aus ereilte. Löws Mantra vom "Survival of the fittest" wurde in Frage gestellt.
Nicht stolpern und dann zuschlagen

Bis zum Auftaktspiel blieben Löw noch knapp drei Wochen, um seinen Kader in Schuss zu bringen, bis zur K.o.-Runde und den möglichen Krachern im Viertel- und Halbfinale waren es aber fünf bis sechs Wochen. Genügend Zeit, um im körperlichen Bereich nochmal einen Schritt nach vorne zu machen.

Es ging also darum, in der durchaus anspruchsvollen Gruppe nicht ins Stolpern zu geraten, um die erfahrenen Schlüsselspieler Schweinsteiger, Khedira und Klose in den entscheidenden Spielen bringen zu können.

Der erste Schlüssel dazu war eine etwas zurückhaltendere Spielausrichtung, mehr Konzentration auf die Defensive und die damit verbundenen personellen Umstellungen. Khedira und Schweinsteiger teilten sich die Spielzeit auf und sammelten so Spielpraxis und Wettkampfhärte.

Härtetest gegen Argentinien

Das ganze Projekt stand gegen Algerien auf der Kippe, als Schweinsteiger mit seinen Kräften frühzeitig am Ende war und Khedira nach seiner Einwechslung ebenfalls kraftlos wirkte. Es war zu spüren, dass der Plan auf Kante genäht war.

Das Halbfinale gegen Brasilien bestätigte das Vorgehen aber in jeglicher Hinsicht. Schweinsteiger ordnete das Spiel aus seiner tiefen Position vor der Abwehr und sorgte für defensive Stabilität im Zentrum, während Klose und Khedira die Brasilianer frühzeitig anliefen und hohes Pressing spielten.

Dieser außergewöhnliche Sieg lässt den Schluss zu, dass Löw mit seinem Personalpuzzle viele Dinge richtig gemacht zu haben scheint. Allerdings war die Partie auch nach 30 Minuten entschieden, die Spieler mussten in der Schlussphase nicht an ihre Grenzen gehen. Das dürfte gegen Argentinien anders werden.

http://www.spox.com/de/sport/fussball/dfb-team/1407/Artikel/wm-2014-finale-loew-personal-puzzle-erfolgreich-schweinsteiger-khedira-klose-fitness-planung.html
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Thu Jul 10, 2014 4:03 pm

Klose about his future...


"Das mach' ich nach dem Endspiel spontan. Aber ich kann leider noch. Ich schleppe meinen Kadaver noch ein bisschen rum."

http://www.spox.com/de/sport/fussball/dfb-team/1407/ticker/pressekonferenz-1007/pk-bendikt-hoewedes-hansi-flick-miroslav-klose-brasilien-argentinien-wm-2014-finale.html

lol!

LEGEND Ale
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Sat Jul 12, 2014 11:54 am

Joachim Löw’s Germany adapt to occupy middle ground in Brazil

Germany’s coach needed to change counterattacking tactics from 2010 World Cup and put greater emphasis on midfielders

Raphael Honigstein

“Unbeatable for years to come”. That was Franz Beckenbauer’s confident vision for a soon-to-be reunited Germany after leading them a World Cup triumph in Rome in 1990. It did not quite work out that way. The legions of East German players who would provide even more guile and firepower to the Nationalmannschaft in The Kaiser’s grand vision trickled down to a handful before too long, and a football nation punch drunk on winning Euro 1996 with an antiquated sweeper system failed to realise that the train heading towards modernity had left the station without them.

Only two years later, the national coach, Berti Vogts, was rummaging through the family tree of the Brazilian striker Paulo Rink, a journeyman from Bayer Leverkusen, in an desperate – and successful – attempt to unearth a German grandmother. The South Africa-born forward Sean Dundee (later a regular non-scorer at Liverpool) was hastily naturalised with the help of the government, despite not having any German ancestry whatsoever. Where had all the players gone?

A generation later, there is still only one player born in the east in the World Cup squad, Bayern Munich’s Toni Kroos. But a dearth of talent is no longer a key concern, irrespective of three of Joachim Löw’s best players never making it to Brazil. Marco Reus, 25, the Borussia Dortmund attacking midfielder who had been widely tipped to be Germany’s most influential player in Brazil, hurt his ankle in the last pre-World Cup friendly against Armenia. His club team-mate, the 23-year-old Ilkay Gündogan, travelled to a Crimean military base to seek experimental treatment for a mysterious back injury but the classy playmaker failed to recover. The defensive specialist Lars Bender limped out of the training camp in South Tyrol with a hamstring injury.

More than a decade’s worth of very expensive, state-of-the-art youth development after the nadir of Euro 2000 – zero points! beaten by England! – has produced more technical players than anyone could cram into two squads. Löw, in charge since 2006, has often been portrayed as football aesthete committed to the beautiful game but the nature of the players that the German production line, with its 366 educational centres and 1,300 highly qualified coaches, has churned out has inevitably determined the identity of this side just as much as Löw’s tactics.

The amount of players who are very good with the ball has shifted the centre of gravity to the middle of the park – to an unfamiliar space, traditionally seen as territory that had to be passed through quickly or given up altogether in favour of keeping things tight at the back.

German teams used to be shaped by outstanding players at either end of the pitch – Gerd Müller and Rudi Völler, Beckenbauer and Sepp Maier. Occasionally, you would have one man who could play a few of these roles at the same time, like Lothar Matthäus in 1990. Or a stray, mistrusted genius like Günter Netzer, the hero of the Euro 1972 win at Wembley, would delight his public with runs from deep and diagonal balls. Dominating the midfield as an end in itself was not seen as desirable, nor did Germany have the requisite personal for such an outlandish endeavour.

Löw’s side, by contrast, have become little more than midfield, a team of midfielders. The groundwork for that development was laid by Louis van Gaal during his tenure at Bayern Munich from 2009 to 2011 but the Germany manager has been happy to accommodate more and more central players to replicate the Bavarian’s possession game.

Löw has described the move as a necessary evolutionary step after opponents had adjusted to Germany’s counterattacking game from the 2010 World Cup – “they all played deeper against us, they knew what we are about,”– and that dynamic has created a new reality with new set of priorities. Like Pep Guardiola’s Bayern, and Barcelona and Spain before them, Löw’s Germany dispensed with strikers altogether to give yet another starting berth to a midfielder.

In Brazil, concerns about the difficult playing conditions have seen a partial retreat from tiki-taka towards a more flexible approach, with a “real” striker in Miroslav Klose and Germany alternating between counterattacking and possession.

Arsenal’s Mesut Özil, the ethereal No10, has been moved to a more peripheral role out in the flanks. His role as the linchpin of the team has been taken by Kroos. The 24-year-old was once described as “the most naturally gifted player I’ve seen since Karl-Heinz Rummenigge” by Bayern Munich’s former youth director Werner Kern but it has taken him three tournaments to win over his numerous critics inside and outside the dressing room.

Kroos’s technical prowess has never been in doubt but he often came across like a player too wrapped up in his own, quiet, discrete excellence to truly dominate games. That has changed in Brazil. As Süddeutsche Zeitung has noted, it is ironic that the man who Bayern have seen as dispensable – too aloof, too dispassionate – has become indispensable shortly before leaving the club. He is off to Real Madrid, after refusing to sign a new deal beyond 2015 at the Allianz Arena.

Sami Khedira might well have to make way for Kroos at the Bernabéu but that’s a concern for another day. The 27-year-old was in danger of being little more than glorified mascot-cum-team psychologist mediator at this tournament – Löw was adamant he should be here because of his positive influence in the dressing room – but the box-to-box tyro has surprised everyone with his strong performances after playing precious little football following his knee surgery in November.

If Khedira is the legs and Kroos is the brain, Bastian Schweinsteiger is the heart. The Bayern Munich midfielder, too, had come into this competition not fully fit after nursing various problems for more than two years. Praised as the “Comandante” by O Globo after the Brazil win, the 30-year-old has rediscovered his authority just in time. His great skill is being able to set the pace of Germany’s game simply by the direction of his passing.

Germany have never had such complete midfield, and it would be almost unfair to single one out as a leading candidate for the Golden Ball. Maybe they could just pass it around among themselves for the next four years.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/jul/11/germany-midfielders-world-cup-2014-brazil
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Sat Jul 12, 2014 12:02 pm

Germany's eyes are on the prize

POSTED BY GABRIELE MARCOTTI

RIO DE JANEIRO -- Maybe it was Toni Kroos who put it most succinctly and aptly after the surreal 7-1 pounding Germany inflicted on Brazil in the semifinal.

"You don't become world champion by winning the semifinal," he said.

And he's right. There is another game to play and, if you fall at that hurdle, everything that came before becomes meaningless.

The 7-1? In the narratives, it will be more about Brazil's self-destruction and ineptness than Germany's prowess.

Advancing to the final? Meh, we've seen it before, in 2008, at the European Championship and in 2002, at the World Cup.

Mess up against Lionel Messi and the cynics will emerge and begin their inquest. Why could they beat the United States only 1-0? What happened in the 2-2 draw against Ghana? How did Algeria manage to give them such a fright? Why don't they have the clinical instinct of the great German sides of yesteryear?

Kroos knows how it works. When you set the bar higher than any national side has ever set it and reach the final four in five consecutive tournaments, folks begin taking it for granted. And unless you deliver a piece of silverware, they won't remember the sustained excellence that has marked the past eight years. Joachim Low will become the guy who pockets eight straight, messes up on the nine and lets his opponent steal the game.

You look at this team and feel that -- unless Messi shows up for 90 minutes, rather than 90 seconds -- the only way Germany don't win their fourth World Cup is if they beat themselves.

And there are plenty of reasons to believe that this won't happen.

For a start, if you believe there is such a thing as "knowing how to win" then it's a skill that this group has mastered. The Bayern contingent of Kroos, Philipp Lahm, Jerome Boateng, Manuel Neuer, Bastian Schweinsteiger and Thomas Muller -- more than half the starting XI -- didn't just win a treble in 2012-13, they steamrollered their way to it. Mario Gotze, Mats Hummels, Mesut Ozil and Sami Khedira have all won silverware, often in dominant fashion, with their club sides.

Further, they've also experienced success in those white Germany shirts, albeit at under-21 level. Neuer, Boateng, Hummels, Ozil, Khedira and Benedikt Howedes were all part of the team that won the 2009 Under-21 European Championship, beating England in the final 4-0.

Then there's the fact that they've improved as the tournament progressed, crucially learning from their mistakes and tweaking to find the right balance. The decision to move Lahm into the back four wasn't just a way to allow Low to keep his beloved high defensive line without leaving Hummels and Per Mertesacker exposed. It also was also possible by the fact that Schweinsteiger and Khedira, both questionable physically going into the tournament, overcame their ailments and became a viable midfield partnership.

Khedira especially has been valuable as a spoiler in the middle of the park and he has been used in different ways. Against France in the quarterfinal, he was an added barricade in front of the back four. Against Brazil, he played higher up in a 4-1-4-1, teaming with Kroos to harass the opposition's deep-lying playmaker.

Indeed, his versatility -- it doesn't show up much on television, but it's obvious when you're fortunate enough to see Germany live -- and that of Kroos has allowed Low to employ multiple defensive looks. When he wants to press high, Pep Guardiola-style, it's a 4-1-4-1, when he's sitting it's a 4-2-3-1, when he's looking to hit on the break it's a 4-3-3, with Kroos retreating to launch passes from deep.

Germany's wide men, Ozil and Muller, have grown as well and the fact that they have such distinct skill sets is actually a plus. Ozil has largely played second fiddle and, with responsibility elsewhere, has thrived. He's not asked to create as much offensively, but as a second option to Kroos he has been eerily reliable, whether as an outlet, in holding up the ball or, against deep defending teams, as an extra creative passer. On the other flank, Muller has been his usual gangly, havoc-wreaking self, coming inside and making space where there appeared to be none.

Germany also have a distinct physical advantage. They outrun the opposition -- Muller, Kroos, Lahm and Howedes are four of the tournament's top eight in terms of distance covered -- and have a significant edge on set pieces, as evidenced by the fact that they've scored five goals from dead-ball situations. And they've been important ones too, such as Miroslav Klose's equalizer against Ghana, Hummels' winner against France and Muller's icebreaker against Brazil. In each case the delivery came from Kroos, who may be as good a dead-ball passer as there is in the world right now.

Throw in the fact that Neuer remains a shutdown keeper who can bandage mistakes with the best of them and you have a unit that appears to be peaking at the right time. And that's everything a manager can ask for.

There's an intangible factor too, one which can be tricky to identify or assess but feels real when you watch them play and speak to them after games. The swagger and bluster that accompanied Germany for much of the 1980s is gone. Those teams were good and they made sure the opponent knew it but they also came across as arrogant and overconfident and, goodness knows, they paid a price for it.

The "new" Germany, for which Jurgen Klinsmann and Low have taken credit, lacked that. They play with a smile and an aesthetic conceit but also a certain timidity: It was almost as if they were apologetic for their talent and, on too many occasions, they were too deferential to the opposition (the semifinal losses to Spain in 2010 and Italy in 2012, when they adjusted to their opponents rather than the other way around, are examples of this). Now you feel the barometer that runs from self-assured to humble is set at the right mark: somewhere in the middle.

They are not lacking self-belief, and they are unafraid to impose themselves on the opposition, yet they also are humble and hard-working up and down the starting XI. And that matters too.

One game to go. Eyes on the prize, young Toni. Eyes on the prize, hold on.

http://www.espnfc.com/blog/marcotti-musings/62/post/1944859/marcotti-germanys-eyes-are-on-the-prize
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Sun Jul 13, 2014 10:41 pm

IMMORTALS!
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debaser

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by debaser on Sun Jul 13, 2014 11:10 pm

Congrats dudes  <Ale> king 
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Effenberg

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by Effenberg on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:25 am

Everything feels perfect all of a sudden. Great tournament. Thanks to all well-wishers!
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Fey

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by Fey on Mon Jul 14, 2014 6:33 am

Surely Im allowed to post this again? Also added that title...I hated that for years!



Surely some people feel the need to say sorry to Low!
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 9:40 am

This WC win is a huge achievement. I put it above WC 1990 and even 1974, only 1954 ranking higher since it put us on the map as a football superpower and for the historic consequences. The reasons are simple:

- first European team to win in South America
- the difficulty of opposition: going by the current FiFA rankings, we beat the #3 (Brazil), #4 (Portugal), #5 (Argentina), #13 (USA) and #17 (France) and #22 (Algeria) on the way, drawing with Ghana (#37) and not losing a match. Regardless of ranking, that's quite a lot of heavyweights and truly strong teams.
- the football we played and the way we won our matches, most obvious in the truly historic 7-1 win vs. Brazil in Brazil in the semis. Children around the globe will look up to our players now, we're the new style kings!
- the climatic and logistic challenges - we had the most grueling schedule of all teams, playing in the heat at noon in the North a lot, in a very difficult group, traveled more than any other team in the tournament

It's a win for eternity, something we will tell our grandchildren about. It's a win for all the hard work on the grassroots level, the huge effort and resources that went into modernising our structures and re-building a youth setup that is producing genuine quality players on a regular basis. It's a win for the DFB, Bundesliga, the lower leagues, amateurs and every supporter, it's a win for this country.

This is a win that should be dedicated to two people in particular, for different reasons. First, Robert Enke, that giant of a goal keeper who would have been so proud of this team. Hope you were watching from heaven Robert, holding your kid in your arms...

And it should be dedicated to Jupp Heynckes, that giant of football. The man who made the very important Bayern 'block' believe in themselves after that disastrous 2012 CL final "dahoam". Who won the treble a year after, playing the best football I've ever seen that became a blueprint for this national side, inspired by the "Gegenpressing" of Jürgen Klopp who clearly takes some credit, too. Germany played Heynckes football this year, that balanced version between the extremes of possession dominance of Guardiola / Van Gaal (in his Bayern years) and counter attacking mayhem of 2010.

Last, but definitely not least, praise must be given to Joachim Löw. The man I criticised so harshly and so often. The way he showed tactical flexibility in this tournament, the risks he took by taking a half fit Schweinsteiger and Khedira to Brazil with the intention to play them in the latter stages, the way he proved that he isn't that stubborn idiot many, me included, believed him to be. Most importantly, and that's truly remarkable, the way he reacted to the challenges in the final. Löw's weakness has always been his inability to deal with situations that didn't go as planned. Khedira got injured minutes before the match, Löw has the balls to play a totally inexperienced Kramer instead, in a World Cup final that is! Kramer is roughed up and injured in the match just 30 minutes later, Löw has the balls to bring on Schürrle and make an attacking sub, moving Özil in the hole and Kroos back, during a period in which Argentina were putting a lot of pressure on our defence that is! Bringing on Götze, that young lad who was criticised so harshly for weeks, at the end of the match. Schürrle and Götze, a true masterstroke that won us the cup!

Mea Culpa Jogi Löw, I gladly eat that humble pie and clean that egg from my face. You learned from that disastrous 2012 campaign, you became a much better coach in the process. Yes, Germany had a excellent squad, but we also had many injuries, and the way Löw improvised and steered this team to success is absolutely admirable. Hats off.
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Kroos

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by Kroos on Mon Jul 14, 2014 9:52 am

blutgraetsche wrote:This WC win is a huge achievement. I put it above WC 1990 and even 1974, only 1954 ranking higher since it put us on the map as a football superpower and for the historic consequences. The reasons are simple:

- first European team to win in South America
- the difficulty of opposition: going by the current FiFA rankings, we beat the #3 (Brazil), #4 (Portugal), #5 (Argentina), #13 (USA) and #17 (France) and #22 (Algeria) on the way, drawing with Ghana (#37) and not losing a match. Regardless of ranking, that's quite a lot of heavyweights and truly strong teams.
- the football we played and the way we won our matches, most obvious in the truly historic 7-1 win vs. Brazil in Brazil in the semis. Children around the globe will look up to our players now, we're the new style kings!
- the climatic and logistic challenges - we had the most grueling schedule of all teams, playing in the heat at noon in the North a lot, in a very difficult group, traveled more than any other team in the tournament

It's a win for eternity, something we will tell our grandchildren about. It's a win for all the hard work on the grassroots level, the huge effort and resources that went into modernising our structures and re-building a youth setup that is producing genuine quality players on a regular basis. It's a win for the DFB, Bundesliga, the lower leagues, amateurs and every supporter, it's a win for this country.

This is a win that should be dedicated to two people in particular, for different reasons. First, Robert Enke, that giant of a goal keeper who would have been so proud of this team. Hope you were watching from heaven Robert, holding your kid in your arms...

And it should be dedicated to Jupp Heynckes, that giant of football. The man who made the very important Bayern 'block' believe in themselves after that disastrous 2012 CL final "dahoam". Who won the treble a year after, playing the best football I've ever seen that became a blueprint for this national side, inspired by the "Gegenpressing" of Jürgen Klopp who clearly takes some credit, too. Germany played Heynckes football this year, that balanced version between the extremes of possession dominance of Guardiola / Van Gaal (in his Bayern years) and counter attacking mayhem of 2010.

Last, but definitely not least, praise must be given to Joachim Löw. The man I criticised so harshly and so often. The way he showed tactical flexibility in this tournament, the risks he took by taking a half fit Schweinsteiger and Khedira to Brazil with the intention to play them in the latter stages, the way he proved that he isn't that stubborn idiot many, me included, believed him to be. Most importantly, and that's truly remarkable, the way he reacted to the challenges in the final. Löw's weakness has always been his inability to deal with situations that didn't go as planned. Khedira got injured minutes before the match, Löw has the balls to play a totally inexperienced Kramer instead, in a World Cup final that is! Kramer is roughed up and injured in the match just 30 minutes later, Löw has the balls to bring on Schürrle and make an attacking sub, moving Özil in the hole and Kroos back, during a period in which Argentina were putting a lot of pressure on our defence that is! Bringing on Götze, that young lad who was criticised so harshly for weeks, at the end of the match. Schürrle and Götze, a true masterstroke that won us the cup!

Mea Culpa Jogi Löw, I gladly eat that humble pie and clean that egg from my face. You learned from that disastrous 2012 campaign, you became a much better coach in the process. Yes, Germany had a excellent squad, but we also had many injuries, and the way Löw improvised and steered this team to success is absolutely admirable. Hats off.

this really sums it up  cheers ok 
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 10:05 am

Germany is the only one of the three football superpowers, Brazil, Germany and Italy, who won the WC in each one of those countries: Germany (1974), Italy (1990) and Brazil (2014).
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 10:45 am

Löw: I told Götze to show he is better than Messi

The Germany coach hailed his side's World Cup triumph as the culmination of 10 years' work after they beat Argentina 1-0 in Sunday's final at the Maracana

By Greg Stobart at the Maracana

Germany coach Joachim Low says he told "miracle boy" Mario Gotze to show that he is better than Lionel Messi before his winning goal in Sunday’s World Cup final.

Gotze came on as a second-half substitute before scoring with a volley in extra-time as Germany beat Argentina 1-0 at the Maracana to win their fourth World Cup.

Low was seen speaking to Gotze during the break in extra-time and revealed after the match that he told the Bayern Munich forward to show up Messi and make his country world champions.

"I told Mario Gotze to show to the world he is better than Messi and to decide the World Cup. That’s what I told him – I had a good feeling with him," Low said in his post-match press conference.

"Gotze is a miracle boy. He can play in any position. I always know he can be decisive in a match and he scored a great decider today."

Low first joined the Germany set-up as assistant to Jurgen Klinsmann in 2004 before taking over as coach after the 2006 World Cup on home soil.

The 54-year-old believes the World Cup triumph was the culmination of a decade of constant improvement and says Germany deserved to win a World Cup.

"We started this project 10 years ago and this is the result of many years of work, beginning with Jurgen Klinsmann," Low said.

"Over these years, we made constant progress and improved performances until we did the ultimate thing we had to do.

"If there is one team that deserves this, it is these players. Guys like Per Mertesacker, Lukas Podolski, Bastian Schweinsteiger, Philipp Lahm, Miroslav Klose who have been in the group this whole time.

"The team spirit is unbelievable. They have unbelievable willpower and that is why we made it.

"The players gave everything, with Schweinsteiger leading them and Lahm running forever.

"I told them before the game that they would have to give more than ever before to do something they had never done before – win the World Cup.

"We are the first European team to win the World Cup in Latin America and this makes us proud. This deep joy and happiness will remain forever."

http://www.goal.com/en/news/3790/world-cup-2014/2014/07/14/4957720/low-i-told-gotze-to-show-he-is-better-than-messi?ICID=HP_HN_3

cheers
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 10:49 am

This one is for you Kroos... Laughing

World Cup victory confirms Germany supremacy on almost every measure

After so many years of commanding respect the nation should rejoice that its football is finally recognised as beautiful

It cannot surely be long before Angela Merkel is pictured placing a consolatory arm around David Cameron, after being overheard lecturing Vladimir Putin on the trouble with 4-4-2, and brochures extolling Germany will become popular in high-street travel agencies as the world wakes up to a much-underrated destination. Who needs Barcelona when you’ve got Bavaria?

In boardrooms around the globe, football club owners will be instructing their chief executives to “get me a German”. Across assorted time zones it is no longer enough for a goalkeeper to have “safe hands”. Thanks to Manuel Neuer the era of “sweeper-keepers”, boasting strong lines in fancy footwork, is upon us.

With the death of tiki-taka now rubber-stamped, aspiring football coaches will eschew study trips to Spain, instead flocking to a rather large patch of Europe stretching from the Baltic to the Alps.

Anxious to replicate what Miroslav Klose describes as his country’s “Super Blend” of aesthetics and über-efficiency, the Football Association will inevitably introduce a five-year plan designed to accelerate the implementation of German-ification throughout all areas of the English game. They might stop just short of equipping the computer screen-savers at St George’s Park and Wembley with images of Joachim Löw/Merkel/Thomas Müller/Sami Khedira super-imposed on Rio’s Christ the Redeemer statue.

As Löw – his somewhat patchy record in club management long since forgotten – is pursued by the Champions League glitterati, British politicians may begin wondering whether the startling synchronicity between the philosophies behind Germany’s economic and footballing revivals is entirely coincidental. Parallels are bound to be explored.

From Dresden to the Dutch border, Germans should swiftly come to terms with finally being recognised as being truly beautiful after all. After so many years of commanding respect, admiration – albeit sometimes grudging – and even fear, a football evolution that, in typically methodical manner, began in 2000 has culminated in a velvet revolution.

Although it is symbolised by a fourth World Cup trophy, and first since 1990, this international coup was essentially pulled off during that astonishing 7-1 semi-final demolition of Brazil. When Juninho declared that Germany were playing as his compatriots once did and watching them had made him “very happy”, it felt like an epiphany. Not to mention the vindication of an awful lot of meticulous hard work. In the space of 90 extraordinary minutes it seemed as if a nation’s reinvention had been all but completed.

In 2000, remember, Germany was the sick man of Europe. As the economy stalled, the national football side suffered elimination from the European Championship after failing to win a single match.

Fast forward 14 years and under Merkel’s chancellorship her country has regained economic powerhouse status; and, under first Jürgen Klinsmann’s tutelage and now his one-time sidekick’s, a fast, technical, ethnically diverse Germany team have reached at least the semi-final of every international tournament since 2006. During Brazil 2014, Merkel texted every Germany player a good-luck message and later sent congratulations. While some predicted their team would once again choke at the final hurdle, the chancellor had faith the “system” would be fully endorsed.

Just as the country’s rebranded, heavily yet subtly tweaked version of socially responsible capitalism (a bit more ruthless than before but still big on fair competition, long-term goals and employers maintaining the sort of paternalistic attitudes towards employees now scorned in many UK quarters) paid dividends so too has the Bundesliga’s similarly socially responsible football model.

Fans enjoy controlling influences at clubs, television revenues are distributed evenly and ticket prices pegged, while “mercenary” foreign owners are kept out. The conditions remain ripe for top-class development of indigenous youth which, facilitated by high-calibre coaching, takes place alongside academic education.

Germany has reaped the rewards of staffing the Bundesliga with more than double the number of homegrown players found in the Premier League. Not to mention producing around 10 times the English contingent of pro-licence qualified coaches.

So much for the macro picture but at micro level German glory will prompt individual prosperity. The Stanford University scientists behind the “CoolingGloves” CoreControl technology that Mesut Özil and company routinely donned at half-time in Brazil’s heat to reduce their internal body temperatures to optimal levels, should flourish. England may have decided against purchasing these cramp-preventing chill mitts but, if the 2022 World Cup takes place in Qatar, everyone will want a pair.

The German multinational software company SAP Data which, in a neat example of the synergy between the nation’s industry and its football, provided Löw with endless groundbreaking performance and sports-science statistics can also expect to boom.

Trying telling Merkel that politics and sport do not mix. Or that success does not breed success.

http://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/jul/13/world-cup-victory-germany-supremacy-every-level
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 11:14 am

Schweinsteiger was MOTM yesterday. Boateng was immense also, of course, as were others, but Schweinsteiger was a warrior. Unbelievable how well he played, on the biggest stage, losing his partner Khedira and being booked early (for nothing), being constantly fouled by the Argies, often with great brutality to provoke a reaction (so he could be sent off), still keeping his cool and coming back. Again and again, keeping everything together, making crucial tackles and winning the ball in dangerous positions, giving our game structure. Unbelievable.

If one of those c**ts, this goes out to the likes of Effenberg, Matthäus, KPB and you otto, my dear friend, EVER questions the leadership, winning mentality and bottle of this man again, I'll personally come looking for you. A true giant of German football, up there with the greats. A performance for the ages!
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BoBo Vieri 32

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by BoBo Vieri 32 on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:54 pm

this is where it all started

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/euro2000/797033.stm
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 1:57 pm

Not exactly true, it started after 1998 already, but Euro 2000 increased the pressure to reform our structures dramatically. And it finally paid off.

I wonder what Italy are going to do now, having failed at the group stages of two consecutive WCs, for the first time since 1950.
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BoBo Vieri 32

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by BoBo Vieri 32 on Mon Jul 14, 2014 2:04 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:Not exactly true, it started after 1998 already, but Euro 2000 increased the pressure to reform our structures dramatically. And it finally paid off.

I wonder what Italy are going to do now, having failed at the group stages of two consecutive WCs, for the first time since 1950.

Probably nothing because of lack of money. The FIGC could take measures of they wanted - the blueprint has already been set by Germany, and it would also improve Serie A teams' performances in Europe.

I think Italy at this point in time are where Germany were in 1998.
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Murray

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by Murray on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:03 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:Not exactly true, it started after 1998 already, but Euro 2000 increased the pressure to reform our structures dramatically. And it finally paid off.

I wonder what Italy are going to do now, having failed at the group stages of two consecutive WCs, for the first time since 1950.

Italy won't do anything.

If there was a world championship for procrastinating & dithering, they would win it every time.
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BoBo Vieri 32

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by BoBo Vieri 32 on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:06 pm

where did you watch the match blut? and what's the reaction been like in germany (media, at work, on the streets etc.) ?
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:09 pm

Italy is a giant of football. There is tradition, a big league and more than enough financial resources to improve the structures. If a small country like Belgium can do it, Italy most definitely can do it, too.

Maybe they do need a real disaster like our Euro 2000 campaign to finally realise that some change is necessary. I don't think that Italy are not able to do it, it's just the lack of political will.

Plus, the Italian youth setup is in a much better shape than ours was in 2000. You at least have a professional youth setup and scouting, in addition to thousands of licensed coaches, things that didn't really exist in Germany back in the days. So you don't have to revamp everything like we did.
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:13 pm

BoBo Vieri 32 wrote:where did you watch the match blut? and what's the reaction been like in germany (media, at work, on the streets etc.) ?

I watched it with my family and friends, nothing special.

The mood is awesome, the WC was exactly what this country needed after such a long time. A lot of celebrating, parties etc. going on. Even at work everybody is brimming with joy. Germans are a negative bunch, truly miserable despite living a relatively easy life in one of the world's richest countries. The WC brings up that rarely seen optimism and sheer joy in people, everybody seems nicer and more relaxed. May it long continue.
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messiah

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by messiah on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:15 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:Schweinsteiger was MOTM yesterday. Boateng was immense also, of course, as were others, but Schweinsteiger was a warrior. Unbelievable how well he played, on the biggest stage, losing his partner Khedira and being booked early (for nothing), being constantly fouled by the Argies, often with great brutality to provoke a reaction (so he could be sent off), still keeping his cool and coming back. Again and again, keeping everything together, making crucial tackles and winning the ball in dangerous positions, giving our game structure. Unbelievable.

If one of those c**ts, this goes out to the likes of Effenberg, Matthäus, KPB and you otto, my dear friend, EVER questions the leadership, winning mentality and bottle of this man again, I'll personally come looking for you. A true giant of German football, up there with the greats. A performance for the ages!

WHAT!

Mascherano was man of the man, and Boateng the best player for german.

Argentina were the better team through much of the first 90 minutes, even though it was with shit football, none of the germans bar Boateng game to play, if argertina had their finishing boots on, the game would have been over by the 60th minute.

Bastian was good, not great

as i saw it, it was another final where the big names Germans failed to stamp their class on the game, kinda like the last CL final where they won, but none of them stood out.

Anyways congrats, beating brazil 7-1 means they deserve everything that game to them, and argentina deserve to lose with that horrid finishing
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blutgraetsche

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by blutgraetsche on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:22 pm

Schweinsteieger was on his own, as Kroos had a mare and he got a soft early booking for nothing early in the match. He was constantly fouled by the Argies throughout the match, he hold everything together, made some crucial tackles and kept fighting regardless, always keeping his cool. It was a performance for the ages, a truly magnificent match.

This doesn't take anything away from Boateng, who was absolutely incredible, too. But Schweinsteiger was the heart and soul of this team. You make no sense whatsoever ("big Germans" Neuer, Schweinsteiger, Lahm were amongst our best players).

You've had this agenda for quite some time now. One would expect it to have died after that spanking Barcelona got by Heynckes' Bayern in 2013 latest, but you continue with this nonsense even if the evidence is slapped at your face. Bizarre, but that's Euroboard for you.

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messiah

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Re: DIE WELTMEISTER!!

Post by messiah on Mon Jul 14, 2014 3:30 pm

blutgraetsche wrote:Schweinsteieger was on his own, as Kroos had a mare and he got a soft early booking for nothing early in the match. He was constantly fouled by the Argies throughout the match, he hold everything together, made some crucial tackles and kept fighting regardless, always keeping his cool. It was a performance for the ages, a truly magnificent match.

This doesn't take anything away from Boateng, who was absolutely incredible, too. But Schweinsteiger was the heart and soul of this team. You make no sense whatsoever ("big Germans" Neuer, Schweinsteiger, Lahm were amongst our best players).

You've had this agenda for quite some time now. One would expect it to have died after that spanking Barcelona got by Heynckes' Bayern in 2013 latest, but you continue with this nonsense even if the evidence is slapped at your face. Bizarre, but that's Euroboard for you.


the snapping has nothing to do with it, I congratulated Bayern and moved on

Lahm was good better than bastian
Neuer had nothing to do, despite Argentina having the better chances, so horrible were their finishing
Bastian was Ok-good, not great in any form shape or way, compare his performance to Mascherano and tell me it was truely great.

Just like the final against Durtmond where, it was the young germans like rues who shone in the final, bastian and lahm and the rest again, were ok at best, not horrible, not not outstanding

their were two outstanding players yesterday, Mascherano and Boeteng. even Garay and Demi were better than Bastian

and I am a huge bastian fan, been for years. check my post history

But he was Not MOTM

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